The transcripts of the trial of Charles Taylor, former President of Liberia. More…

  • Good morning, Mr Witness.

  • Good morning.

  • Yesterday afternoon before the Court adjourned, I posed the question to you about Zigzag Marzah and the sort of access someone like Mr Marzah would have to the President of Liberia. Let me read to you the question I posed and the response you gave. This is from yesterday's transcript. I am at page 47521. Mr Witness, the question was:

    "Q. Would someone like Zigzag Marzah sit down and share a

    meal with the President?

    A. I never saw during that time - I never saw

    Zigzag Marzah eating with his chief, Benjamin Yeaten, let

    alone to even sit with the President and drink a cup of

    water."

    Let's pick up from there, Mr Witness. Persons like Zigzag Marzah, you said that, as a bodyguard to Benjamin Yeaten, he would sometimes follow Benjamin Yeaten to the Executive Mansion or wheresoever the President was. To your knowledge, did the President of Liberia have one-on-one interactions, as in meetings, as in meals, with persons like Zigzag Marzah?

  • No.

  • How about radio operators?

  • Excuse me, Mr Anyah. Mr Witness, how can you say "no" in that categorical way? Were you there when Mr Yeaten and Mr Marzah were with the President?

  • Yes, your Honour. I said "no" because looking at the personality of Zigzag Marzah in this situation, that is to say, even Zigzag Marzah - the special assistant to Benjamin Yeaten who is Sampson Wehyee does not have that privilege or any physical proximity to the President. Zigzag Marzah was just a common servant to Benjamin Yeaten. He was sometimes a driver, even though he may travel with Benjamin Yeaten to where the President was, but he was a distance away from the President as well as other bodyguards to Benjamin Yeaten.

  • Mr Witness, on the record it appears that you made reference to both Zigzag Marzah and Sampson Wehyee as assistant to Benjamin Yeaten. Who was special assistant to Benjamin Yeaten?

  • The special assistant or the special aide - the special aide to Benjamin Yeaten was Sampson Wehyee.

  • And when you say "assistant to Benjamin Yeaten, who is Sampson Wehyee, does not have the privilege or any physical proximity to the President", in that context are you speaking of Marzah or Sampson Wehyee?

  • I am speaking about both of them. Marzah or Sampson Wehyee were just bodyguards to Benjamin Yeaten.

  • Thank you, Mr Witness. I was going to ask you about radio operators and what sort of access they had to the President of Liberia. Let's take it in stages. Let's start with the time period when you say you served as a radio operator at the Executive Mansion. You told us it was from 1997 until late 1998, when you moved to Base 1. In that period of time, while you were at the Executive Mansion, can you tell us, for example, how many times you, Mr Witness, saw the President of Liberia at the mansion?

  • During the time that I was assigned to the mansion, I never had the opportunity to see the President because he was very far away from us, the radio operators. We may sometimes have the privilege to see his convoy from the window of our office, but we were a distance away from the presidents - the President.

  • Well, if I recall on Tuesday last, 24 August, you said that the radio room at the Executive Mansion was on the fourth floor. You also said that the President's office was on the fourth floor. Are both of those facts correct?

  • Are you saying that in over a year when you served at the Executive Mansion you did not have the opportunity or privilege to see the President?

  • Yes.

  • Can you amplify your answer more for the judges? How is it that you and the President never crossed paths?

  • Okay. Even though the office of the President was on the fourth floor and also the SSS office was also on the fourth floor, but on the fourth floor there was, let me say, a demarcation. That is, the office of the President was somehow distinct from that of the SSS office and there was a wall dividing the President - the President's office from the SSS office.

    Besides that, all the radio operators were assigned to a room that I earlier described wherein the base shift office - where the base shift office commander's office was. Within the base shift commander's office, it was divided into another compartment or partition where the radio office was. And when you were in there, you did not see or know any movement of the President.

  • Was your experience in this context of access to the President typical of the experiences of other radio operators; that is, did other radio operators have more or less the same sort of access that you had to the President during your stay at the Executive Mansion?

  • Exactly so.

  • How about when you were posted and assigned at Base 1 from late 1998 onwards, what sort of access, if any, did you have to the President of Liberia?

  • At that time there was a very wide distance between myself and the President at this time. I normally saw the President at this time sometimes on a television or hear his voice on the radio, the community radio or the FM radio.

  • Was this experience you have described for us typical of the experiences of other radio operators who were assigned at Base 1 vis-a-vis access to the President of Liberia?

  • Yes, that was the same experience.

  • Thank you, Mr Witness. Yesterday we were considering some names and whether they meant anything to you. I'd like to continue from there. Have you heard the name Liberian Mosquito before?

  • What does that name stand for?

  • First of all, Liberian Mosquito was a nickname that was given to the AFL commander that was assigned in Lofa by the name of Christopher Varmoh. But normally in Liberia when an individual was --

  • Your Honours, can he repeat his testimony slowly.

  • Please pause. Mr Witness, you need to slow down a little bit for the interpreter. You were explaining that normally in Liberia when an individual is something. Continue from there.

  • As I said, in Liberia when one is slim and tall and sometimes dark in complexion, the community or the people referred to that person as a mosquito because a mosquito is a creature that was not fat, it's very slim. So they referred to that person as a mosquito. So Christopher Varmoh was such a person; very slim, tall and he was referred to as Mosquito, so that became his name throughout the war.

  • Can you spell his last name for the record, please?

  • Varmoh. V-A-M-B-O, Vambo. Christopher Varmoh. I may be corrected later on.

  • You referred to him as an AFL commander in Lofa. When was he a commander for the AFL in Lofa?

  • I can remember Christopher taking assignment in Lofa from 1998 to '99 but I did not know when he left there actually. But he was in Lofa when LURD started their offence - the offensive on Liberia.

  • Thank you, Mr Witness. Do you know somebody by the name --

  • And it was because of his assignment there as battalion commander in Lofa when LURD launched the attack, one of their spokesperson or commander said he was a mosquito spray because Mosquito was assigned to Lofa as a military commander. So he has come as an insecticide to kill the AFL Mosquito.

  • Who said that he was now Mosquito Spray?

  • Mosquito Spray was one of LURD's spokesperson or LURD's army personnel who said that on the BBC once, that he was a mosquito spray.

  • Thank you, Mr Witness. Do you know somebody called Ellie Mabey, E-L-L-I-E M-A-B-E-Y?

  • Thank you. You spoke previously of Junior Gbarjulu and you told us that he was the commander of the reactivated Jungle Fire group. What was the relationship between Benjamin Yeaten and Junior Gbarjulu?

  • Junior Gbarjulu and Benjamin Yeaten do not have any biological relationship. That notwithstanding, he was the military bodyguard commander to Benjamin Yeaten. In '98 he was the SSU bodyguard commander to Benjamin Yeaten. And when Jungle Fire was reactivated, he now became the Jungle Fire chief of staff or overall commander.

  • Did Junior Gbarjulu occupy any positions within the security services of Liberia during the administration of Samuel Kanyon Doe?

  • I don't know. I never knew Junior Gbarjulu prior to the war in Liberia.

  • Was Gbarjulu ever a member of the SSS?

  • Was Gbarjulu ever a member of the ATU?

  • When was he a member of the ATU?

  • Gbarjulu became a member of the ATU when the SSS - excuse me, when the SSU was dissolved. In some part of '98 or '99 when the SSU was dissolved the ATU was formed. So all the SSS - I mean, all the SSU personnel were told to go to the ATU base and undertake the ATU training and then become ATU personnel. That was where he joined the ATU.

  • Thank you, Mr Witness. You mentioned in passing during your evidence the name Varmuyan Sherif. Who is Varmuyan Sherif?

  • Varmuyan Sherif was a member of --

  • Your Honour, can he kindly repeat his answer more clearly.

  • The interpreter did not understand something you said. Can you repeat your answer again. You started out by saying that Varmuyan Sherif was, and then we did not follow you after that.

  • I am saying that Varmuyan Sherif was a member or a general of the former ULIMO-K of Alhaji GV Kromah and then during the six month council government he was appointed as the - as deputy director - no, excuse me.

  • You are saying "Five-Six". What does Five-Six mean?

  • That was a code, Five-Six, the chief of protective service. He was responsible for the movement of the President of the convoy. He was referred to as Five-Six. He was in that position during the council of state, a six-man council. And after the election - after the elections of '97, 1997, he was brought to Benjamin Yeaten by Joseph Montgomery. And I could remember Montgomery telling Ben that Varmuyan Sherif was cooperative. That is, he was cooperating with them even though he had been a member of the ULIMO-K, but he was helping to disclose to the government all of those government properties that Alhaji Kromah hid after the transitional government was over. Alhaji Kromah hid some government property and through Varmuyan Sherif those properties were received - were retrieved. So Montgomery pleaded with Benjamin Yeaten so that Varmuyan Sherif can maintain his position as Five-Six. So he was accepted and he continued to be the chief of protective service, which was the Unit 56, until he became sick - he became mad.

  • Thank you for that response. I will allow you to continue, I just wanted to interpose a question. When did Varmuyan Sherif become sick or ill?

  • Varmuyan Sherif became mad in '99, I think early in 1999 - 1999.

  • What do you mean when you say he went mad?

  • He was mentally ill; that is, he became a madman.

  • And what happened to him after that?

  • What I heard was that - when he became ill, the government sent him to out of Liberia, I think maybe one of these African countries, for traditional treatment. Then when he came back he was still not mentally correct, but, as he was improving, he was transferred from the SSS to the immigration, that is the Bureau of Immigration and Naturalisation. That was what I heard of him at last.

  • When he was transferred to the Immigration and Naturalisation Services, do you know what position he occupied in the INS?

  • No, I don't know.

  • And when was he transferred to the immigration services?

  • I do not remember the time, but what I do remember is that when he came back he was transferred from the Presidential Guard to the immigration.

  • Thank you, Mr Witness. What about the name Abu Keita, does it mean anything to you?

  • No, I do not know the name Abu Keita.

  • Thank you.

    Madam President, I have some exhibits to show the witness, and they are all previously admitted exhibits. What we have done in the instances where an exhibit has prior markings by a witness, we have created duplicates of the exhibit, and our proposal is that the duplicates be shown to counsel opposite and then be shown to the witness. They are identical to the actual exhibits.

    The first exhibit in question is Prosecution exhibit P-45A. P-45A. To the extent that the original is marked in any way, I have a clean copy here that could be displayed to the witness.

  • Mr Anyah, I wonder did you give a list of these exhibits to the Court Management beforehand?

  • Yes, certainly, we did.

  • Your Honour, P-45A is not indicated in the list that was availed to Court Management.

  • Well, let me check what email I sent to Court Management, but I will take Madam Court Manager's word for it, but --

  • Mr Anyah, I think what would expedite matters, even for Chamber, because we have a courtroom file, folder, where we have all of these exhibits; we would also appreciate a list of these exhibits so that they are posted. This will save time.

    So the first one you said will be 45A, and if we could have the others.

  • Yes. I should say for the record, in my email to the CMS on 23 August P-45A is listed, as is the alternative exhibit, which is identical to P-45A, which is P-255. I have the email here.

  • I do concede, your Honour.

  • Let me give you a list of the exhibits. They are as follows: P-68I. Madam President, some of these are confidential. I will not deal with those ones in open session. I will deal with the confidential ones in private session, with leave of your Honours. P-68I is number 1. It is also identical to P-152G. Number 2 is an audio clip, P-261. Number 3 is P-158. Number 4 is P-159. Number 5 is D-414, which is the same as P-387. Number 6 is P-98. Number 7; we have already used number 7, which is D-141, it was the photograph shown to the witness yesterday from Presidential papers, page 181 of the Presidential papers. Number 8 is P-153A. Number 9 is P-68C. Number 10 P-153B. Number 11 is what I mentioned earlier, P-45A, which is the same as P-255. Number 12 is P-153C. Number 13 is P-68G. Number 14 is P-397B. Number 15 is P-493E. Number 16, P-265B. And number 17 is P-152D. Those are the exhibits I wish to put to the witness.

  • Thank you. We'll have the first one now put before the witness, that is, P-45A.

  • Thank you, Madam President.

  • I thought the purpose of counsel giving lists long beforehand was so Court Management could get ready. It seems to me you are now looking for the exhibits.

  • Madam President, with the leave of your Honours, may we just have counsel opposite verify the photograph I have of the exhibit and we can show it to the witness.

  • Yes, indeed. Could one of the people in Court Management please collect the photograph. Can you please put the picture on the overhead. Work on the focus, please.

  • Mr Witness, this is a photograph that the Court has admitted in evidence as Prosecution exhibit P-45A. Can you take a look at that photograph and tell us if you identify anybody on the photograph.

  • Yes. I can identify two persons among the three in this picture.

  • Mr Witness, can you start from the left to the right and, for those you identify, can you mention their names and an item of clothing they are wearing - describe an item of clothing you see them wearing.

  • Okay. I can identify the first on the right with a cap.

  • Can you point to the person, please.

  • This person - this person.

  • The left. That is the left of the photograph.

  • The left. The left of the photograph, I'm sorry. This is Zigzag Marzah. And next to him in the middle is Daniel Tamba, earlier referred to as Jungle. These are the two I can identify.

  • Mr Witness, since there are two persons in the picture with a hat on, can you describe for the record an item of clothing being worn by Zigzag Marzah.

  • Zigzag Marzah, a blue-like jean jacket and a jeans trousers with a red T-shirt under it and a cap, a blue - blue and red in colour. He has his hands - this is what I can identify in connection with his dress code.

  • Thank you, Mr Witness.

    Unless there are any questions, Madam President, I intend to move to the next one. And, unless your Honours wish, I don't intend to ask the witness to mark it. It's already an exhibit.

  • Yes, yes, that's enough. He has adequately explained - described the clothing.

  • Could this photograph, which is Defence exhibit 414, also identical to Prosecution exhibit P-387, be shown to the witness. Could it also be shown to counsel opposite, please.

    Madam President, on this particular photograph, the version that is P-387 had some words written around it, that is some text. We have removed the text, and we have only retained the photograph. The photograph is identical to the prior exhibits, D-414 and P-387.

  • Mr Witness, can you look at that photograph and tell us if you recognise anyone?

  • Who do you recognise? Please point to them and describe something they are wearing.

  • Okay. I'll begin from the left. The lady sitting here with a yellow cap, a grip in front of her, she is - she was a radio operator to the President, and her name is Oretha Gweh. In front of her is what looks like a grip. That's a communication's set, a VHF communication set, called Flyaway, Flyaway.

  • Can you point at what you say is a communication set.

  • This. This. This is it. It's open and it's in the form of a grip. This is the communication set that I'm speaking of.

  • And the person, Ms Gweh, is whom? Just point to the person Oretha Gweh.

  • Here is Oretha Gweh.

  • Who else do you recognise in the photograph?

  • Next to her is President Taylor, in the military suit, sitting in a big chair.

  • And next to President Taylor is Benjamin Yeaten, wearing, I think, blue-jeans suit and a slippers with a yellow - with yellow and black stripes, with his arms crossed over his laps.

  • Thank you, Mr Witness. The next photograph for your consideration is P-265B. Mr Witness, do you recognise anyone in this photograph?

  • Thank you. The next photograph is P-153A. Mr Witness, you are looking at a copy of Prosecution exhibit 153A. Can you tell us if you recognise anyone in that photograph?

  • Yes. I do recognise two persons here, beginning with the first man standing in a military jacket, with combat - with a red T-shirt underneath it. He is Benjamin Yeaten. And next to him, here, he also has a jacket on, he is Jungle, Daniel Tamba.

  • The person facing the photographer, that you've pointed to, are they carrying a gun or a weapon?

  • Those two I'm talking about are all carrying a gun. Ben has a gun in his hand, with a red T-shirt under his camouflage T-shirt, and a combat military cap. And here is Daniel Tamba, Jungle; he's also carrying a gun.

  • Thank you, Mr Witness. The next photograph is P-158. And we could do it at the same time as P-159; we could view the two together. The first one is 158 and the next one is 159.

    Mr Witness, you're looking at a photograph which has been admitted as P-158. Do you recognise who is pictured in that photograph?

  • Yes. His name is Jabaty. He is the one I mentioned yesterday whose last name I do not know, but he came to Liberia with Sam Bockarie during Sam Bockarie's final stay in Liberia in late 1999, and he also joined the ATU. He's now in an ATU uniform. He joined the ATU.

  • Can we also look at P-159? Who is pictured in that photograph, Mr Witness?

  • Is that the same person that's pictured in P-158, the previous photograph?

  • Yes, this is the same Jabaty.

  • Thank you, Mr Witness.

  • Is it possible to improve the quality of the photograph that you show on the public overhead, please, either with more light or something?

  • Here he's in his full ATU outfit.

  • And that's P-159. Thank you, Mr Witness. The next photograph is P-153B, like Bernard. Mr Witness, do you recognise anyone on Prosecution exhibit P-153B?

  • Yes, just one person.

  • Witness, who is that person?

  • The person in the middle wearing a gown. His name is Daniel Tamba, Jungle.

  • Can you describe the gown, its colour or any other particularity?

  • Yes. Daniel Tamba is wearing a blue gown with a design from the chest to the neck, and it has a little opening right around his neck, with a black shoe on and something in his hand looking like black, something that I cannot describe in his right hand.

  • Thank you, Mr Witness. The next photograph is P-153C.

  • With the glasses in this person's face, I cannot identify him actually.

  • Very well. Thank you, Mr Witness. The next photograph is P-397B. Mr Witness, do you recognise who is pictured in that photograph?

  • Yes. This is General Benjamin Yeaten.

  • By looking at what he is wearing, the attire that is depicted, do you know when this photograph was taken, or can you give an approximation of when it was taken?

  • This picture may have been taken in, I think, 2003.

  • Why do you say so?

  • I said 2003 because it was during the course - course of the LURD invasion that he was promoted to the rank of chairman of the joint chiefs of staff and also general front line supervisor with the rank of a four-star general.

  • And do you deduce that from looking at the stars on his beret and on his collar or shoulders?

  • I recognise him by his face.

  • I understand that. We're asking about the issue of the four-star general. The person depicted whom you've identified as Benjamin Yeaten is wearing a beret with four stars on it on his head, and then on his collar, on either side, are four stars as well. What do those stars signify to you?

  • These stars mean he was called in Liberia lieutenant general.

  • Very well. May we look at Prosecution exhibit P-493E. Mr Witness, this is Prosecution exhibit 493E. Can you take a look at it and tell us if you recognise anyone.

  • Yes. First from the left, I recognise this person. I know him as General Alex, a brigadier general from the navy division.

  • Did you say Alex or did - what did you say as his last name?

  • I said I know him as General Alex. A-L-E-X, Alex.

  • Here in the military outfit is General Benjamin Yeaten. Here is General Benjamin Yeaten. Then at the back here you are seeing an individual with a camouflage jacket and a black cap and a yellow T-shirt with the same "Navy" written on it. I mentioned him yesterday, if I've not forgotten that he had - in relation to General Yeaten's trip to Sierra Leone in a helicopter in 2000. He was the one who told me about what happened to them as stated yesterday. He is Sylvester Willor, a former Special Forces of the NPFL.

  • Thank you, Mr Witness. Do you recognise anyone else?

  • I'm not too certain about this lady, so I don't want to go further.

  • Mr Anyah, did we have the spellings Stephen Willor, or Sylvester.

  • Yesterday it was Sylvester.

  • Sylvester Willor.

  • The witness spelt it yesterday on the record. I can give your Honours the page.

  • [Microphone not activated].

  • Thank you. For now those are all the photographs I wish to show the witness. The rest I will apply to show --

  • Mr Anyah, this last photograph, I do not know if we have another witness who spoke to the personalities in the picture the way this witness has spoken and described them. I would suggest if you have a clean copy that he actually marks it with the names.

  • Yes, Madam President. Thank you, Madam President.

  • Mr Witness, that copy of the photograph you have, can you take the felt tip pen and can you identify the persons you have mentioned by drawing an arrow to them and writing their name and any description you wish to put about the person.

  • Just the names would be sufficient, not the description. I see what you mean. No, I think the names will be sufficient.

  • Thank you, Mr Witness. Can you please sign the back of that document, date it with today's date which is 31 August 2010, and please put your DCT number, 008. Thank you, Mr Witness.

  • Could the witness be relocated to his usual seating position.

  • Mr Anyah, if you like, we can mark that photograph. That is the replica of exhibit P-493E as now marked by the witness DCT-008, that is now marked MFI-3.

  • Thank you, Madam President.

  • Mr Witness, I now want to go over with you references that have been made to Base 1 and Benjamin Yeaten during the course of this trial. Other witnesses have come before the Court, they have testified about communications with Base 1 and they have made references to Benjamin Yeaten. I will read to you various transcripts, starting with those that were given in public session.

    The first of those is from 8 April 2008, starting at page number 6889. If we go to line number 9, I will start from there. Mr Witness, listen to this. A question was posed to the question who testified. The question was this:

    "Q. In the RUF you were operating on 7 megahertz?

    A. Yes, sir, we operated on 7 megahertz.

    Q. I heard you mention lower side.

    A. We have the frequency and of course the mode. You

    bring it down, it's the LSB. You bring it this way, it's

    the USB, on the same frequency but different band. There

    is no flow of communication. We can be on the same

    frequency, but if we are not on the same band - take,

    for example, if I'm on 70110 but on LSB, that person - or

    let's say the other operator, on the same frequency, 70110,

    but on USB, will never understand what we are saying. We

    will not even get what we are saying on the radio.

    Q. What do the letters USB and LSB stand for?

    A. USB is the upper side band and LSB is the lower side

    band.

    Q. So these two were the different bands on which the

    frequencies operate, is that correct?

    A. Yes, sir. And we were on the 7 megahertz and the

    Liberians were on the 6 megahertz, but there were certain

    stations who had access to our net, they knew all our

    frequencies and they had the authority to call, and besides

    they had our code."

    Let's pause there. A couple of questions, Mr Witness. This witness appears to be saying that you could be on the same frequency but if one person was on what he called the LSB, the lower side band, and another person was on the USB, the upper side band, that you would not be able to understand each other. First of all, are you familiar with those terms LSB and USB?

  • Yes, I am familiar with those terms.

  • What is meant by a band? What does "band" represent?

  • The word "band" on the VHF radio represents the frequency or the number on which a specific radio is programmed for onwards transmission.

  • Now, when this witness told the Court that persons on different bands but on the same frequency would not understand each other, what is your explanation about that? What do you understand about that?

  • Okay. This witness is saying that on the radio the band is also like the room - to say the same room or airwave at which a specific communication is transmitted on a particular frequency. Yet it has a dividing column. That is, there is a system on the VHF radio that is responsible to divide this band on a particular frequency but in different rooms. That is, the upper side band, that is the USB, and the lower side band, as he rightly explained. When you are operating on a particular frequency but on a different band, either on the lower side or the upper side, as long as somebody is operating on the lower side band, that person will not receive a particular communication on that frequency but the lower side band. That means there is a variance between the two of you.

  • Mr Witness, just to clarify the record. The record currently reads that: "As long as somebody is operating on the lower side band, that person will not receive a particular communication on that frequency but the lower side band?"

    Now, if someone is on the lower side band on a particular frequency and someone is on the upper side band of that same frequency, will they be able to follow each other's communication?

  • No. They would not follow each other's communication. Definitely you are being given room so that the other operator on that same frequency but in a divided room, so one that is operating on the same frequency but on the USB will not monitor those operating or transmitting messages on the same frequency but on the lower side band.

  • Thank you, Mr Witness. How about the indication here that the Liberians were on the 6 megahertz? Was it the case that Liberia operated its radio equipment on the 6 megahertz?

  • No. But I want to explain something here. Okay. The radio communication - the radio communication is not like - let me say, for example, the telephone frequency that a particular company is entitled to a particular frequency or a normal operation. It is not like that. So on the radio communication, as we were operating, we were not assigned to a particular number or frequency. And, furthermore, there were two bands on the VHF that were suitable, in terms of communication. These are the 7 megahertz, as he spoke of, the 8 megahertz and then sometimes the 6 megahertz. But the 7 megahertz was much preferable, in terms of communication, because communication made on any frequency, based on the 7 megahertz, that is the beginning number of the frequency that begins with the number seven, was much more suitable and very clear at the time. So the Government of Liberia was operating on various frequencies based on the 7 megahertz, and sometimes we operated on the 6 megahertz, but we were not assigned to a particular frequency; it could be changed at any time.

  • So, Mr Witness, when counsel asked you: "How about the indication here that Liberians were on the 6 megahertz, was it the case that Liberia operated its radio equipment on the 6 megahertz?" and you said "No", is that answer accurate? You've just told us that Liberia sometimes operated on the 6 megahertz.

  • Yes, your Honour. I said no, to the point that the witness there is trying to kind of assign the Liberian radio communication just on the 6 megahertz. That was why I said no. We operated on either of those megahertz, based on the clarity of the communication or the clarity of the signal for that moment.

  • So when you say "either" you mean what, What are you referring to, either of those megahertz?

  • I mean that we operated on the 6 megahertz sometimes, based on the clarity of the wave, the radio wave, we operated on the 7 megahertz, we operated on the 8 megahertz, and we - even the 10 megahertz, if the wave permitted us, by providing us clear communication. So, we were not assigned to a fixed frequency; that is what I am saying.

  • Now, Mr Witness, you see the reference there to "we were on the 7 megahertz". And when we read the following pages to come, you will see that this person meant by this that the RUF in Sierra Leone was on the 7 megahertz. At the time you were at Base 1, communicating with Buedu, was it the case that Buedu only operated on the 7 megahertz?

  • No. During the time there was communication between Base 1 and Buedu, communication was sometimes made on the 6 megahertz, sometimes on the 5 megahertz and sometimes on the 7 or 8 megahertz, depending on the clarity or depending on their selection, let me say. But they were not assigned to a fixed frequency, as with the Government of Liberia. They also used to change from one band to the other, one band to the other. At times they would call and say "we have changed our frequency" and they would say "this is the new frequency" and they would give it to us.

  • Thank you, Mr Witness. Let's continue. Line 28 on that same page, page 889, question to the witness:

    "Q. Now, when you say there were certain stations, which

    stations were these?"

    This is in relation to the witness's prior statement, starting at line 25 of that page, to the effect that:

    "There were certain stations who had access to our net, they knew all our frequencies and they had the authority to call and besides, they had our code."

    We go to the next page for the answer, page 6890, the witness responds:

    "A. One Base 1 had our code. Base 1 was operated by an

    operator called Sunlight.

    Q. Where was Base 1?

    A. Base 1 was located in Congo Town, that is to Benjamin

    Yeaten's personal residence.

    Q. And you say it was operated by?

    A. Operator Sunlight, one, and two, Operator Dew."

    If we skip a few lines to line 15 on the same page, there's a question posed to witness there:

    "Q. So the operators for the radio called Base 1 were?

    A. The name Base 1 was the call sign of the radio, Dew,

    Sunlight were the code names of the operators who operated

    that radio.

    Q. And you say that radio had access to the RUF code?

    A. Yes, sir. They had a copy of our code and the other

    station 020 at the Executive Mansion Ground, that was

    operated by Sky 1.

    Q. When you say 'operated by Sky 1', what do you mean?

    A. Sky 1 is the name of the operator who operated that

    radio with call sign 020.

    Q. To your knowledge, who did the operators Sunlight and

    Dew for the radio Base 1 report to?

    A. They reported to Benjamin D Yeaten, Unit 50."

    Let's pause there. Mr Witness, this person told the Court that Base 1 had their code, Base 1 was operated by Dew and Sunlight, and another radio station that had access to the RUF code was 020 at the Executive Mansion. To your knowledge, was there a radio at the Executive Mansion Ground with the call sign 020?

  • No. I never heard a code or a call sign, 020, assigned anywhere.

  • Are you aware of any radio station at the Executive Mansion Ground having the RUF code?

  • When you spoke about the code yesterday, the code that was brought by Memunatu Deen, you made a distinction between the general RUF organisational code and the particular code that was brought by Memunatu Deen. You recall that?

  • Yes.

  • Is it accurate to say, as this transcript suggests, that Base 1 had the RUF code?

  • That is not accurate.

  • What is the more accurate statement in your view?

  • The more accurate status is that Base 1 had a special code prepared for just Base 1 and Bravo Zulu 4. And the official code for the RUF was not given to Base 1. More especially, that it was not given to Dew and Sunlight. Memuna might have had it but did not give it to Dew and Sunlight. The codes that were given to Dew and Sunlight by Memuna were the special codes prepared for the station in Buedu, Bravo Zulu 4 or Planet 1 and Base 1.

  • Mr Witness, are you saying that the official code was different from the code that {redacted} were given? The official RUF code was different from the code that was given to {redacted} at Base 1?

  • The official RUF code was different from the code that was given to Sunlight at Base 1.

  • Yes, I do beg your pardon. But how do you know this?

  • Because the code was given, and Sunlight was told by Memuna that this code was prepared particularly for the communication between Bravo Zulu 4 and Base 1. And Sunlight made comparisons whenever the RUF was transmitting, or whenever a message was coming to Base 1. Whenever they were transmitting messages, Sunlight tried to make comparison, copied down the code, tried to decode it and it never corresponded.

  • I must, I think, redact my own record. Madam Court Manager, at page 33, line 7, in the comments of the Presiding Judge, she is addressing the person to whom the code was given. Please redact that person.

  • Thank you, Madam President.

  • Mr Witness, going back to the transcript, there is reference to an operator called Sky 1. Do you know an operator called Sky 1?

  • Sky 1 is a Liberian. Sky 1 was a member of the Anti-Terrorist Unit, that is the ATU. Sky 1 was also an element of the ATU radio communications unit.

  • What do you mean by "an element"?

  • When I said "an element", that means that he was under the commandership of other commanders. He was not a commander but a subordinate within the radio communication of the ATU.

  • Was he a radio operator?

  • Yes, Madam President.

  • Where was he based?

  • He was based at the ATU office within the fence of the Executive Mansion, the ATU office within the fence of the Executive Mansion.

  • Madam President, going back to the redaction that your Honour ordered, this is at page 33, I think your Honour spoke of perhaps one of two possible redactions. I just raise this for your consideration. There is one where your Honour starts by saying, "Are you saying that".

  • Yes, yes. I do see what you mean. Madam Court Manager, the redaction is more than one, I think. The Court manager has understood. We will have it redacted.

  • Thank you, Madam President.

  • Now, Mr Witness, going back to Sky 1, you told us where Sky 1 was based. You said the ATU office within the fence of the Executive Mansion. That office you're referring to, is it inside a building?

  • This office is not in the building of the Presidential Palace, which is referred to as the Executive Mansion building. It was not in that building. It was apart from the building.

  • Describe the structure or building in which the ATU had its office, this office you are referring to. How many storeys, for example, was it?

  • The ATU office building is about a two-storey building, a ground floor and an upper floor, and in front of the two-storey building was like a single security booth. Like, that was where the radio for the ATU was installed. So that is to say that the ATU radio was not within the very building of the ATU office but an attachment to the ATU office building.

  • And that ATU office building, is it different than the building you referred to as the Executive Mansion?

  • It is very different. The Executive Mansion is an eight-storey building, and the ATU office I'm describing is two storeys. Here they refer to it as one floor because the ground floor, they don't consider it as number one. But there the ground floor, we start counting from it as number one.

  • Thank you, Mr Witness.

  • And, Mr Anyah, further clarification. This building, the ATU building where the radio was, was there a radio? And if so, what was the code for the radio, the ATU radio?

  • The ATU radio had a code, but I do not remember now because I was not constantly dealing with them. Yes, I mean, I was not constantly dealing with them.

  • Was that code O2O or 020?

  • That code, O2O or 020, is totally foreign to my knowledge.

  • Let's continue with the transcript, over to the next page, 6891, 6891. Now, starting at line number 4, there's a question posed:

    "Q. Now, you also mentioned radio call sign 020 which you

    say was at the Executive Mansion; is that correct?

    A. Yes, sir.

    Q. It had an operator whose code name was?

    A. Sky 1.

    Q. Sky 1. Now, who do you recall that - the radio at the

    Executive Mansion reported to whom - or to who?

    A. To the President.

    Q. Who was the President then?

    A. President Charles Taylor was in power at that time.

    Q. Let us focus briefly. You say that these two radios

    had the code for the Sierra Leone - for the RUF network; is

    that correct?

    A. Yes, sir.

    Q. How do you know this?

    A. I was an operator, and when I was taken to Liberia, the

    number of times I received a message from them in our code,

    and besides, when I was to cross into Liberia, I was given

    a special code which was distributed to operators Sunlight,

    Sky 1, and the other radio that was in Foya, and that was

    the code we used."

    Let's pause there. We start with the statement that Sky 1 and the radio at the Executive Mansion - well, let's be more precise. It is that the radio at the Executive Mansion reported to the President, Charles Taylor. Lines 10 and 11, that's what they amount to.

    To your knowledge, Mr Witness, was the radio that was at the Executive Mansion a radio that reported directly to the President of Liberia?

  • No. The radio at the Executive Mansion did not report directly to the President of the Republic of Liberia. Like I said here, there was a system. The radio was based almost, I can say, in the office of the base shift commander, and if there was any information from the radio that the operators at the Executive Mansion received, which was supposed to be handed over to the President or that it was necessary for the hearing of the President, those radio operators will give that information to Colonel Elita Yates, the radio dispatch unit overall commander, and she, in turn, will give the information to the base commander that controlled the entire security of the Executive Mansion, and the base commander will give that information maybe to the Five-Six, which is the chief of protective service. So it was a chain. It was a chain of command. They did not report directly to the President. As I told you, they never had direct access to the President, even though they were on the fourth floor.

  • If I may inquire, what would be the purpose of stationing a radio in the Executive Mansion, If you know? What would be the purpose of stationing a radio at the Executive Mansion?

  • Yes, your Honour. You know, we are talking about security network. Now, in security communication is important. So the securities around the President needed communication. So that was the essence of the radio being installed, to collect or transmit information, either on the short range or the long range. And also, it's less expensive, as compared to telephones.

  • Mr Witness, through the years 1998, 1999, and up until 2000, did Liberia have a cellular telephone system?

  • Please repeat your question.

  • Yes. I'm trying to follow-up on the President's question about why you would have a radio at the Executive Mansion. What other means of communication were available to the Government of Liberia, let's say in 1997, when President Taylor became President, starting with cellular telephones? Were those available in Liberia in 1997?

  • There was no cell phone company in Liberia during 1997. Even up until '98 or maybe 2000, there was no telephone - no cell phone company.

  • If someone wanted to relay information quickly, in the days when there were no cellular telephones in Liberia, could they have used a land telephone, for example?

  • What I also remember is that the land phone was not effective. It was somewhat damaged due to the war.

  • Were radios, then, very high frequency radios, of importance when communicating messages quickly from one place to another during the early part of President Taylor's presidency?

  • Please repeat your question.

  • Yes. How important were very high frequency radios for communication purposes during the years 1997, 1998 and 1999, in Liberia?

  • A very high frequency radio was important at that time because there was no telephone system in place, there were no cellular phones, and even for the land phones, and even if it was in existence, it did not cover the entire country. It was only in circulation in Monrovia. So if something happened in the rural areas or in up-country, wherein the information was about security issues or it is a security information that the government needed to know, it would take a very long time. That means they would have to dispatch someone by car or send a letter, at which time it will have delayed. So it was essential at that time, and it helped to speedily disseminate information - information to the security system or the security network.

  • Now, we continue on that transcript, same page, 6891. And you heard me read that this witness said that they were an operator, that they were taken to Liberia and, when they crossed into Liberia, they were given a special code which was distributed to operators Sunlight, Sky 1 and the other radio that was in Foya and that was the code that they used.

    If we were to go to page 6912, the same witness said at line 18:

    "A. I can remember giving code to Sunlight myself and one

    to Sky 1 when I was to get to Liberia."

    And, if we went to page 7017 of 9 April, we will find out that this witness said that they were in Liberia from June to July of 1999 until the year 2001.

    Now, Madam President, in the circumstances, I would make an application, which would be that in order to accurately effectively rebut this witness's evidence, the current witness would have to know this witness's name. And I would like to make this application in private session.

  • Mr Bangura, this, I presume, was a protected Prosecution witness. What is your view on this?

  • That is correct, your Honour, the witness testified with protective measures, and the Prosecution does not object to the witness's identity being disclosed to this witness in private session. Obviously, the witness may be better able to respond to questions put to him by counsel if he were given those details.

  • Very well. Madam Court Manager, we will go into a brief private session because we're going to look at evidence that was given by a protected Prosecution witness.

  • [At this point in the proceedings, a portion of the transcript, pages 47555 to 47558, was extracted and sealed under separate cover, as the proceeding was heard in private session.]

  • [Open session]

  • Your Honour, we are in open session.

  • Mr Witness, we have now returned to open session, but just a warning from the Court that any information you have received pertaining to a protected witness, and the fact that that witness was here and testified, is confidential and you are not to repeat it to anyone. It's part of the protective orders of Court. Do you understand that?

  • Yes, Madam President.

  • Now, Mr Witness, the Prosecution witness's evidence we're considering said that a special code was given to the other radio that was in Foya. Yesterday when you testified, you spoke of Amphibian Base as a radio base in Foya. You also referred to it with the code name Forstrot Yankee.

    Now, are you aware of that radio station in Foya receiving the RUF radio code from an RUF radio operator?

  • No, I am not aware of that.

  • Can we please go to page 4910, still the 8th of April 2008 transcript. I think I meant 6910. I apologise. Starting at line number 3. Mr Witness, listen to this question posed to the witness:

    "Q. And the radios that were within this net, could you

    just name them again, that were operating within this very

    restricted net?

    A. The stations I communicated with were Base 1, 020 and

    that Foxtrot Yankee, and of course I had - the radio I was

    operating in the jungle with General Yeaten was call sign

    72-72, and the one left on the base was 72 Victor. So

    wherever we went on jungle operations, I used the mobile

    radio set 72, 072."

    Now, Mr Witness, let me ask you a question about this. We have been given a number of call signs here by the witness. The witness says they were operating a radio in the jungle with Yeaten with the call sign 72-72. The witness then said the one left on the base was 72 Victor. So we have 72-72 and 72 Victor. The witness then said whenever they went on Jungle operations they used the mobile radio set 72 and they referred to it as 072. Mr Witness, did Benjamin Yeaten have a mobile radio with the call sign 72?

  • No. Benjamin Yeaten never had a radio with this call sign, 72-72.

  • How about the call sign 072?

  • That is also negative.

  • Forgetting for a moment whether it was a mobile or a fixed radio, did Yeaten, to your knowledge, ever have a radio with the call sign 72 Victor?

  • All these are totally strange.

  • Thank you. We continue, line 11:

    "Q. Before we talk about the period that you were over in

    Liberia and were operating the radios that you have just

    mentioned, let us for this moment focus on the time before

    you left to go to Liberia."

    And we go to line 18:

    "Q. Within this period which radios were within the network

    that could --

    A. The same radios, Base 1, 20, and Foxtrot Yankee. If I

    knew Base 1 was at that location that I have mentioned when

    I cross into Liberia.

    Q. And on the Sierra Leone side, which radios could

    communicate to those radios?

    A. Stations mandated to communicate with those radios I

    have just named were Marvel and Planet 1.

    Q. Who mandated or gave the authority for these stations

    to communicate with --

    A. Sam Bockarie."

    Let's pause. Mr Witness, when you were stationed at Base 1, was there ever communication, to your knowledge, with a radio in Sierra Leone called Marvel?

  • No.

  • When you were at Base 1, to your knowledge, did the radio in Foya, the radio you referred to as Amphibian Base, alias Forstrot Yankee, did that radio, to your knowledge, communicate with Buedu?

  • Did it communicate with Bravo Zulu 4 or Planet 1?

  • If they did, then I did not know. It's not to my knowledge.

  • Is it possible it could have happened and you would not have known about it?

  • Yes.

  • Mr Anyah, we'll take our midmorning break now.

  • Yes, Madam President.

  • And we will reconvene at 11.30.

  • [Break taken at 11.01 a.m.]

  • [Upon resuming at 11.32 a.m.]

  • [The accused present]

  • Mr Anyah, please continue.

  • Thank you, Madam President. Madam President, may it be noted for the record that Mr Taylor is now in attendance at the proceedings.

  • Yes, certainly, I've noted that.

  • Mr Witness, before the break we were considering the evidence of a Prosecution witness, TF1-516. I'd like to continue from there. Could we please go to the transcript of 8 April 2008, page 6911.

    Starting at line number 1, Mr Witness, listen to this. The question was posed to TF1-516:

    "Q. Could anybody else give that authority?

    A. Sometimes General Issa, but really it was Sam Bockarie

    most often giving mandate to call those stations, and

    those stations as well could call us. Those stations could

    call us, where we are called sometimes to tell Log, that

    is Sam Bockarie, to put on the 2-1, that is to put on the

    telephone. Those calls came from 020, call sign Base 1,

    they --

    Q. Continue.

    A. They could call us and say, 'The principal on this side

    wants the principal to get on the 2-1.' So we would rush

    to inform Sam Bockarie to go on the telephone.

    Q. You have mentioned the word telephone here. We are at

    this moment talking about radios. Was there any other form

    of communication with the RUF - was there any other form of

    communication which the RUF used to communicate, apart

    from radios?

    A. No, telephone satellite. Mobile satellite phone.

    Q. A mobile satellite phone?

    A. Yes, sir.

    Q. Who used the mobile satellite phone?

    A. Sam Bockarie brought those satellite phones. He

    brought the mobile satellite phone and told us he had been

    given that phone by his chief.

    Q. Do you recall when you first saw Bockarie with the

    mobile satellite phone?

    A. I saw him with that phone in Kenema, when I was

    travelling.

    Q. When you say he reported that he had been given the

    phone by his chief, who do we refer to?

    A. The President Charles Taylor. He was the one he used

    to refer to as his chief."

    And then over to page 6912, we see the question at the top of the page:

    "Q. You say you saw Sam Bockarie with a mobile satellite

    phone in Kenema. When was this, can you remind us?

    A. That was 1997.

    Q. About what period in '97?

    A. During the AFRC."

    Let's pause there. Let's go back to page 6910 and consider a few things. Mr Witness, you heard me read at lines 4 and 5 that this witness said they were sometimes called and they were told to tell Log, that is Sam Bockarie, to put on the 2-1, the 2-1 being the telephone, that those calls came from 020 and also from Base 1. When Base 1 called Buedu during the time you were at Base 1, was Sam Bockarie referred to as Log, L-O-G?

  • No. Excuse me. Sam Bockarie was not referred to as Log, as the witness has mentioned, by any operators at Base 1.

  • What is the general code, in operator parlance, for a telephone? How is a telephone referred to by radio operators in code form?

  • The telephone, in regard to what is called a universal police code, that is ranging from 10-1 up to 100. The telephone is referred to as 10-2-1, 10-21 universally, according to the universal police code. So this was not a particular code for the Liberian government or any other thing. It is referred to that universally.

  • You heard me read what that witness said. The witness said that when the calls would come, "They could call us and say, 'The principal on this side wants the principal to get on the 2-1'."

    During communications between Base 1 and Buedu, was anyone referred to as the Principal?

  • No one was referred to as Principal during the communication between Buedu and Base 1. No one was referred to as Principal.

  • You heard me read that the witness said that Sam Bockarie had a mobile satellite telephone. The witness said Sam Bockarie told them he had been given that phone by his chief and then the witness went on to say that "chief" there meant President Taylor. And we went on to the following page where it was disclosed that the witness saw Sam Bockarie with that mobile satellite telephone in Kenema in 1997 during the AFRC period.

    To your knowledge, did Charles Taylor give Sam Bockarie a mobile satellite telephone as far back as 1997?

  • No.

  • When you say no, is it that you say that it did not happen or is it that you do not know?

  • I don't know, and what I want to comment on is that the witness is talking about - he's stating a date of 1997. At that time, in 1997, the call sign Base 1 was not in existence. There was no radio call sign called Base 1, and I never knew an individual called Sam Bockarie. So I don't know whether he had a phone at the time or not. I cannot comment on that. I don't know.

  • Very well. We are still on page 6912, which is where I stopped before asking that we go to the previous page. Page 6912.

  • Excuse me.

  • You also mentioned the call sign for Sam Bockarie to be Log between Buedu and Base 1. But when I was at Base 1, what I observed between Buedu and the operators at Base 1 was that in the first place - let me begin with the term Principal. Principal was referred - refers to the head of an institution. And even during our NPFL time of operation, we used the word "principal" meaning the principal commander of a particular group. But at this time, communication between Base 1 and Bravo Zulu 4, which is Buedu, at this time, this term Principal was totally avoided by the operators at Base 1. That is, when they used the term Principal, anyone who could be monitoring at the time would quickly notice that they are talking about their commander or someone higher than them from their side or from the other side.

    And secondly, the term Log was not used at any time during communication between Base 1 and that of Bravo Zulu 4 but Sam Bockarie was referred to as The Subject or sometimes Master, as well as 50 was also referred to as Victor Oscar or sometimes Subject. So the term Log is totally foreign to me.

  • Thank you. Thank you, Mr Witness.

  • But, Mr Witness, are you saying that for a person who is inquisitive and wants to monitor Bravo Zulu 4, you think they would not be curious to hear a strange name such as Victor Oscar or something called - what was the other name that you gave us?

  • Or Subject? Are you saying that a person, for example, the President or someone else in government, would not ask, "So who is Victor Oscar and who is Subject?"

  • What I am saying is that during this communication, somebody would expect people - we expected people to sometimes monitor communication. That was why we were dealing with codes. But in referring to a senior officer or to your commander and you say the general term Principal, this - somebody who may be monitoring this will quickly know that you are giving a message to another person about your commander or about your head of an institution. So this was why we avoided this term Principal. But the term Victor Oscar would take time for anyone to know what was Victor. Victor Oscar was a phonetic alphabet, V-O. So that could be a serious homework for that person to know who Victor Oscar was until the code is revealed to him or her.

  • Mr Witness, the codes that you have told us that were used, Subject and Victor Oscar, are you saying to the Court that they were chosen because they do not convey any hierarchy or rank or superiority about the person they are talking about?

  • Exactly so.

  • Now, going back to the transcript, page 6912, there is a question by the Presiding Judge at - there is a question by Judge Sebutinde at line 7 where it was asked, "Did they also share the same code?" This is the radio net in both Sierra Leone and Liberia. And then the witness answers:

    "Yes, at some point in time, we had the same code. The

    stations in Liberia I'm referring to were Base 1, call sign

    020 and Foxtrot Yankee. That's Foya. There the helicopter

    used to land. There was a radio station there which had

    our code.

    Q. How were these codes shared? How did they get your

    code?

    A. I can remember giving code to Sunlight myself and one

    to Sky 1 when I was to get to Liberia.

    Q. But before this time that you took codes to Sunlight

    and to Base 1 there had been communications with Liberia.

    Is that correct?

    A. Yes, sir. Daf knew their code. Daf. And again --

    Q. When you say Daf knew their code, what period are we

    talking of?

    A. Long before, before I went to Liberia, okay? And

    besides, there was a man sent to work with Sam Bockarie.

    He was a radio operator. In fact, at some point in time,

    he led the signal unit. He was called Sallay. So most

    times it was Sallay who was called to talk to his

    brothers."

    And we are now over at page 6913. Is that being displayed? Yes, thank you. I'll repeat the sentence.

    "A. So most time it was Sallay who was called to talk to

    his brothers in a very" - then it's indiscernible -

    "dialect that we did not understand but this man, Sallay,

    got killed at some point in time in Foya and of course

    nobody knew what killed him."

    Mr Witness, let's pause there. The previous page I just read, in responding to the judge's question, the witness said that the Liberian stations had their code and those stations were Base 1, 020 and Foxtrot Yankee. Now, we've covered Base 1 and whether or not Base 1 had the RUF code. You have told us that there was no radio station in Liberia to your knowledge with the call sign 020. How about Foxtrot Yankee? Do you know whether Foxtrot Yankee had the RUF code?

  • I don't know whether Foxtrot Yankee had the RUF code and I don't know whether Foxtrot Yankee ever communicated with the RUF.

  • Now, we addressed previously some of these issues but let me ask you a question here. The witness says that - the witness TF1-516 gave a code to Sky 1 in Liberia, and we will come to it but you will find out that this witness said that they gave the code to Sky 1 whilst Sky 1 was at Base 1. That is Sky 1 was visiting Base 1 when this code was given to Sky 1. First question for you: Did Sky 1 ever visit Base 1 at the time you were stationed at Base 1?

  • Since Base 1 was installed and came into being as a radio communication unit, I never saw Sky 1 at Base 1. I never saw Sky 1 at Base 1 and Sky 1 never visited Base 1.

  • Madam President, may I have a moment? I want to cite the proper portion of the transcript. Madam President, the reference I was looking for was to the page where the witness said that they handed over the code to Sky 1 at Base 1. To the extent that I have not found it, I will retract or withdraw that question to this witness. I recall reading it but until we get to it, I will withdraw that question.

  • Mr Witness, to your knowledge, was Sky 1 ever handed the RUF code by any RUF operator in Monrovia?

  • Thank you. Now, continuing with --

  • Is that no, he doesn't know or he's saying assertively, no, he was never handed the code?

  • You understand the distinction, Mr Witness?

  • Yes, okay. No, I don't know but I want to make a comment regarding Sky 1.

  • I don't know, but Sky 1 may have been in possession of the RUF frequency or their code. That is, Sky 1 once told Sunlight that in early - I mean, late 1998, at that time, Base 1 had been established. He once told Sunlight he, Sky 1, had a brother in Sierra Leone with the rebel RUF, his brother's name was one Superman. I don't know him anyway. Superman. And this Superman had been in communication, had been in radio communication, with him, with Sky 1, from Sierra Leone to Liberia, and that Sky 1 was to make an arrangement for him, because Superman wanted an apartment in Liberia. So according to Sky 1, Superman asked him to make an arrangement for an apartment that Superman would rent through Sky 1, that is, he would send the money or give the money, I did not know by what means, but the money for the rent would be given to Sky 1 and he would spearhead the programme, he told Sunlight 1. So based on that note, I think Sky 1 may have been in possession of the RUF frequency or code, but I did not know whether anyone gave the RUF frequency to him, but based on his explanation, it denoted to me that Sky 1 had been in possession of the RUF frequency as well as the code.

  • Thank you, Mr Witness. Yes. The reference I was looking for is at page 7034 and it is the reference to TF1-516, saying that Sky 1, the operator for 020, was met by that witness at Base 1, that it was at Base 1 that TF1-516 gave Sky 1 the code or the tract. So, Mr Witness, since I withdrew the question, I ask you again: Did Sky 1 ever visit Base 1 at the time when you were assigned to Base 1?

  • No. Sky 1 never visited Base 1 at the time I was there.

  • Do you remember an RUF radio operator handing the RUF radio code to Sky 1 at Base 1?

  • Just a point of clarification.

  • Please pause. Mr Bangura, please.

  • It's with reference - regarding the reference counsel gave, I'm just trying to find the page. I'm not so sure, we have page 7034. Is it in relation to transcript of 8 of -

  • No, Mr Bangura, I apologise. It's 9 April 2008 and page 7034. My apologies.

  • We will come to that transcript. I just went ahead of myself.

  • Then let the witness answer the question that you asked because he didn't get a chance to do that.

  • Yes, Madam President.

  • Mr Witness, can you please answer the question? Let me repeat the question.

  • The question was: Do you remember an RUF radio operator handing the RUF radio code to Sky 1 at Base 1?

  • Sky 1 never visited Base 1, and Sky 1 - {redacted} did not receive any code from any RUF operator at Base 1.

  • Thank you. Going back to the transcript of 8 April 2008, page 6912, that witness told the Court, when the witness testified, that Daf knew their code. The question to that witness was: "Before the time when the witness took the RUF codes to Sunlight at Base 1, there had been communications with Liberia." The witness said yes. And the witness went on to say that Daf knew their codes, as in the Liberian codes.

    To your knowledge, Mr Witness, did Daf have access to the Government of Liberia radio communication codes?

  • Daf never had access to the Government of Liberia communication code, but Daf had access to the frequency, the general frequency, of the Government of Liberia. That was where he sometimes contacted Base 1.

  • Mr Anyah, if you look at page 59, where you repeat the question to the witness - let me just find it - the question where you say: "Do you remember an RUF radio operator handing the RUF radio code to Sky 1 at Base 1?" If you look at the answer that the witness gave, do you reckon that we should redact the person who did not receive any code?

  • I heard the witness give the answer and I will leave it in your discretion.

  • I think we should redact.

    Madam Court Officer, if you see what I've referred to in the answer, we will redact the person that received or that didn't receive any radio codes.

  • Thank you, Madam President.

  • Mr Witness, on the following page, page 6913, the witness went on to say that Daf was a senior operator, that Daf's actual name was Dauda Fornie and then the witness went on to assign a name, a last name, to Sallay, the person he spoke of previously, he called the person as Sallay Duwor, D-U-W-O-R, and a question was asked of the witness, line 29 of page 6913:

    "Q. Now, who sent Sallay Duwor to Sam Bockarie?

    A. At one point" - we are now at page 6914, transcript of 8 April. The witness answers:

    "A. He came from Liberia. He was just a Liberian.

    Q. But you know, how did he come to Sam Bockarie?

    A. During the time the ULIMO-K had cut off, they cut off

    the link between the RUF and the NPFL, Sallay Duwor,

    together with jungle were left in a cut off in the jungle

    around Foya, so when ECOMOG came to disarm the NPFL and the

    ULIMO-K fighters, they crossed into Sierra Leone and stayed

    with Sam Bockarie.

    Q. You mentioned something about Duwor coming to help with

    communications because of the problem with dialect.

    A. Yes, sir.

    Q. Is that correct?

    A. Yes, sir.

    Q. Was it Duwor's intention to come and help only or was

    he assigned?

    A. He was assigned.

    Q. Who assigned him?

    A. They came to Buedu. You know, the NPFL and the RUF had

    the same command chain. They had that chain of command.

    Q. So, are you able to say then who assigned him

    specifically?

    A. This man Jungle was superior to Duwor. He was once the

    radio operator with them in the jungle, so when they came

    to Buedu to Sam Bockarie he was assigned to stay with

    Sam Bockarie to enhance smooth communication with the other

    side.

    Q. Now, you have mentioned the name of a man called

    Jungle. Is that his real name?

    A. Jungle was a man called Daniel Tamba, alias Jungle."

    Let's pause there. This witness told the Court that somebody called Sallay Duwor was assigned to Sam Bockarie to enhance better communication. Indeed, he said to help with communications because of the problem with dialect. And the witness went on to say that both Duwor and Daniel Tamba, also known as Jungle, were cut off when ULIMO-K had cut off the link between the RUF and the NPFL and that they crossed over into Sierra Leone and stayed with Sam Bockarie when ECOMOG came to disarm the NPFL and the ULIMO-K fighters. Let's take these matters in turns.

    You spoke of communicating with the radio operator in Buedu named Sellay. Did Sellay have a last name?

  • I don't know Sellay's last name but he was referred to - but he was introduced as Sellay, and this was how the operators at Base 1 used to call him.

  • In the paragraphs I read previously, starting at page 6912, this witness said that Sellay at one time led the signal unit. He's referring to the signal unit associated with Sam Bockarie. And you told us that the Sellay you spoke with was head radio operator to Sam Bockarie. You remember telling us that?

  • Yes. I said that.

  • The Sellay that you have in mind, was he Liberian?

  • The Sellay that I have in mind, I don't know whether he is a Liberian but I knew him to be a Sierra Leonean because he spoke the Krio fluently, and this was my own judgment, that he was a Sierra Leonean.

  • Do you know how it came to be that he was working for Sam Bockarie?

  • No. I don't know.

  • Did you know whether the person you referred to as Jungle, also known as Daniel Tamba, that you first met in late 1998, whether that person was previously cut off along the Sierra Leonean-Liberian border when ULIMO cut off contact between the RUF and the NPFL?

  • No. I don't know how Jungle went to the RUF or became a part of the RUF, but I know - what I heard about Jungle was that Jungle was a member of the RUF from the beginning of the RUF, but I don't know how he got there.

  • You heard me read the witness's evidence to the effect that the NPFL and the RUF had the same command chain, they had the same chain of command. You were a member of the NPFL, from the early part of the war in Liberia, and you remained in the Government of Liberia as an employee through the conclusion of President Taylor's presidency. Did you know the NPFL to have the same command chain as the RUF?

  • I don't know.

  • When you say you don't know, is it that you don't know whether they had the command chain or it's a lie that they had the command chain, the same command chain?

  • I don't know because I became a radio operator, when there was no cooperation between the NPFL and the RUF, as I was told by previous operators. So in 1994, when I got into the communications system, there was no link between the NPFL and that of the RUF. So it was impossible for the NPFL and the RUF to have similar - a similar command chain.

  • Mr Anyah, may I interrupt with a question?

  • The witness told us earlier that Sky 1 was a radio operator with the ATU at the Executive Mansion. Do you know, Mr Witness, the real name of Sky 1?

  • Madam President, no. I knew him as Sky 1 and that was his code. I don't know - I don't know his name.

  • Mr Witness, going back to this Sky 1, you mentioned communication between Sky 1 and somebody in Sierra Leone. You said Sky 1 had a brother in Sierra Leone with the rebel RUF, his brother's name was Superman. What nationality was Superman, if you know?

  • I don't know. And this was the first time that I ever heard the name Superman, so I don't know whether this Superman was a Liberian, but, based on what Sky 1 told Sunlight, if Superman was really Sky 1's brother, then Superman may have been a Liberian because Sky 1 is a Liberian.

  • You said that Superman had asked Sky 1 to make arrangement for the rental of an apartment that Superman wanted?

  • Now, this apartment, where was it to be rented, in which city?

  • According to Sky 1, this apartment should be situated in Monrovia city, because that was where, according to Sky 1, he, Superman, wanted his family to move in. He wanted his family to move into that apartment.

  • To your knowledge, in which country was Superman's family at the time he was asking Sky 1 to rent this apartment for him; that is, at the time Superman was asking Sky 1 to rent the apartment?

  • I don't know. I don't know.

  • Do you know when communication between Superman and Sky 1 started?

  • No, I don't know. With the exception of the time Sky 1 said, I never heard --

  • Your Honour, can he kindly repeat this answer slowly and more clearly?

  • Please pause, Mr Witness. You have to repeat your answer a little slower for the interpreter. Repeat your answer.

  • I said, I don't know; I don't know what I was saying again. Please repeat the question.

  • Yes, I will repeat the question. The question was: Do you know when communication between Superman and Sky 1 started? And you went on to say, "No, I don't know, with the exception of the time Sky 1 said" - and that's where we lost you.

  • Okay. As I was saying, with the exception of the time Sky 1 explained to Sunlight that he had a brother who had asked him to render this assistance to him, but Sunlight did not ask him when Superman called him or when it happened.

  • You gave us a time frame for when Sky 1 told Sunlight this information. You said Sky 1 told Sunlight this information in late 1998.

  • Yes. Sky 1 told Sunlight this information in late 1998 but Sunlight did not ask Sky 1 when that, your brother, called you.

  • This communication between Sky 1 and Superman, did you get the impression that this communication was official Government of Liberia business?

  • No. This was totally, as he had explained, it was a family issue, it was personal. It had nothing to do with the Government of Liberia.

  • Do you know whether Superman had any family in Liberia?

  • No, but Sky 1, on the second occasion, after he had explained to Sunlight about the arrangement in respect of this apartment, he again introduced a lady, a girl, a light-skinned female to Sunlight in a street. He said, "Oh, this is my brother's fiancee" and Sunlight had known this girl before, but he did not know her to be Sky 1's brother's wife or fiancee.

  • Well, when you're referring to Sky 1's brother's wife, who is the brother there?

  • The brother, Superman, Sky 1's brother that he was referring to from Sierra Leone, who is Superman. Sunlight did not know this girl to be Superman's girlfriend. And also, prior to the first interaction with Sky 1, Sunlight - when Sky 1 explained about the arrangement in respect of an apartment, Sunlight did not know the name called Superman.

  • Did this fellow called Superman ever visit Liberia, to your knowledge?

  • If he ever visited Liberia, then I did not see him.

  • We will come back to this interaction between Sky 1 and the person you referred to as Superman. We continue with the transcript at page 6919, starting at line 17. Mr Witness, listen to the question that was posed to the Prosecution witness:

    "Q. You recall that you mentioned that there was a point

    when there had been communication in fact long before you

    moved over to Liberia, correct?

    A. Yes, sir.

    Q. And you said that the code was known, Daf knew the

    code, and the number of operators also knew the code?

    A. Yes, sir.

    Q. Now you had said that at some stage you were restricted

    from communicating with the other side. Is that right?

    A. Yes, sir.

    Q. Did you know the code at that time?

    A. No, sir.

    Q. How did you know then that this code was known by or

    was common to radios on both sides?"

    We are now at page 6920 the 8 April 2008 transcript:

    "Q. How were you able to tell?

    A. Daf at some point in time, whilst in Zogoda, used to

    communicate with other side in their code and that was

    quite different from the one we were using.

    Q. Was this in your presence?

    A. Yes, sir.

    Q. And also later in Buedu, before you moved over to

    Liberia you were, yourself, able to communicate directly

    with the other side. Is that correct?

    A. Yes, sir, I was receiving call - I used to receive call

    and pass on information to them.

    Q. And did you, yourself, receive calls from these radio

    stations that you have mentioned on the other side?

    A. Messages in code were left with the station sergeants

    to receive, while I had the mandate to establish the

    communication with them.

    Q. Who did you communicate with on the other side?

    A. Sunlight, Dew and Sky 1.

    Q. And did you receive calls from these operators that you

    have mentioned?

    A. Yes, sir."

    Let's pause there. Mr Witness, what this witness is suggesting is that long before this particular witness moved to Liberia, and I have given you a time period for that move to Liberia, the witness testified they moved to Liberia around June/July 1999 and they remained in Liberia until the year 2001.

    Now, the reference for that assertion I have given before, but it can be found at page 7017 of the transcript of 9 April 2008.

    Mr Witness, this witness said that even before the witness moved to Liberia in 1999, that whilst Daf was in Zogoda, the RUF was communicating with the other side, that is Liberia.

    Now, to your knowledge, in the years 1994, 1995 and 1996, were there communications between any NPFL radio stations and Sierra Leone?

  • To my knowledge, in 1994, 1995, up to 1997, there was no communication between the Government of Liberia or the NPFL at the time, with the RUF.

  • But, Mr Witness, how would you know? You joined or you came to do the work that you did in the NPFL after 1998. Is that correct?

  • Please repeat, your Honour.

  • When were you assigned to Base 1?

  • I was assigned to Base 1 in 1998, but I think I remember the lawyer asking a question dating from 1994, 1995, 1996.

  • Precisely. That is precisely my next question: How do you know? How can you say, or how can you answer the question whether or not there was communication between the Government of Liberia, or the NPFL, with the RUF during the period before you joined or you were assigned to Base 1? How can you answer that, or, how do you know that the answer is no?

  • Yes, it's because when I got into the communication sector as a whole in 1994, I was told by previous operators that 1991 and 1992, that there was communication between the RUF and the NPFL, and they had the RUF call sign, call 35B, as I mentioned here; but after that, there was no link any more, there was no link between the NPFL and the RUF, and, in relation to the government, there was no link between the government and the RUF. I was assigned to the Executive Mansion. I was assigned to the Executive Mansion from 1997 to late 1998, and then I moved then to Base 1, when this communication started between the RUF and Base 1.

  • What were the names of these previous operators who told you this?

  • Sorry, I can't remember. It's been a long time, but those were in the system before me. Sometimes when we discussed in certain groups, they say that. That was it. I cannot remember now, sir, but I can remember their information. This is what I remember, the information.

  • Additionally, Mr Witness, before you were assigned to Base 1 in years previous to 1998, who were the radio operators assigned there before you, either their names or their code names?

  • Assigned where, Madam President?

  • Assigned with Benjamin Yeaten as radio operators.

  • There was no radio assigned to Benjamin Yeaten's house prior to my reassignment there, from the mansion to his bodyguard unit, there was no radio there at the time. No VHF radio, to be specific.

  • May I proceed, Madam President?

  • Mr Witness, let's go over a few matters. You told us in 1994 you were assigned as a radio operator at the SSS office in Gbarnga. This is before Gbarnga fell. You remember telling us that on Tuesday, last week?

  • Yes, I said that.

  • You said after Gbarnga was recaptured, you then took up duties at the telecommunications building in Gbarnga as a radio operator for the SSS. You recall telling us that?

  • Yes, I said that.

  • You then said that you stayed at the telecommunications building until 1995, and from 1995 to 1997 you were assigned as a radio operator at the Executive Mansion in Gbarnga. Do you recall that?

  • Yes, I said that.

  • And then it was in 1997 that you moved to the Executive Mansion in Monrovia, yes?

  • And then late 1998, you took up assignment at Base 1?

  • Yes, in late 1998.

  • Now, during all those various stages, 1994 when you were at the SSS office in Gbarnga which was destroyed when ULIMO overran Gbarnga, was there any communication with Sierra Leone when you were assigned at that position?

  • When I was at the SSS office - you mean when I was at the SSS office or before the fall of Gbarnga in 1994?

  • When you were at the SSS office in Gbarnga before Gbarnga fell to ULIMO, was there any communication within the SSS radio network and Sierra Leone?

  • No. There was no radio communication link between the SSS radio and any station, for that matter, in Sierra Leone.

  • How about when you were assigned at the telecommunications building? Was there any communication with Sierra Leone during that period of time?

  • To my knowledge, there was no radio communication from the telecommunications building to any station in Sierra Leone.

  • How about when you went to the Executive Mansion in Gbarnga from 1995 through 1997? Was there any communication with Sierra Leone at that time?

  • There was no communication with Sierra Leone at that time. And to be specific, at this time, we were very busy with the electoral process and we were always eager to hear from Monrovia.

  • And then during your time period at the Executive Mansion in Monrovia, 1997 through late 1998, was there any communication with Sierra Leone at that time?

  • I did not get your question well.

  • Yes. You told us on Tuesday last week, at page 47014 through 47015 of the transcript of 24 August, that you transferred from the Executive Mansion in Gbarnga in 1997 to the Executive Mansion in Monrovia. You said there was a gap when you had no assignment, but ultimately you said after the election and President Taylor's inauguration, some point around then, you took up work at the Executive Mansion in Monrovia. What I want to know is when you started in Monrovia at the Executive Mansion, through the period when you took up assignment at Base 1, was there any communication with Sierra Leone or the RUF by radio?

  • To my knowledge, there was no communication from the Executive Mansion to the RUF or to any Sierra Leonean station at that time.

  • Thank you, Mr Witness. Now, going back to the transcript, page 6920, 8 April 2008, starting at line number 22, the question was asked of that witness:

    "Q. Now, talking about satellite telephone, the use of a

    satellite phone, normally how would communication be

    initiated when the satellite phone is to be used?

    A. We would call from either Base 1 or 020 to tell Log to

    put on his 2-1, or sometimes from 020, Sky 1 could tell us,

    'Tell the principal my principal on this side wants to talk

    to him. Tell him to put on the 2-1.'

    Q. Now, if you just remind us in more simple terms, in

    clearer terms, when you say sometimes a call from Base 0,

    whose radio would that be or whose radio would be - would

    that be?

    A. That's Charles Taylor's radio at the Executive Mansion

    Ground in Monrovia."

    Now, Mr Witness, let's pause there. We see the phrases again, Principal, and we see the code 2-1. This witness was telling the Court that for satellite phone communication to be initiated, Base 1 or 020 would tell Log to put on his 2-1. And then there would be something to the effect, if it was from 020, Sky 1 could tell them, "Tell the principal my principal on this side wants to talk to him." Is this how generally you remember communication with Buedu ensued when you were at Base 1?

  • No. As I stated earlier, when I was at Base 1, I never heard from any of the operators at Base 1 referring to either Ben or any commander from their end as Principal. And I agree that the code 10-2-1, I don't know whether he meant 10-2-1, but the code 10-2-1 is referred to telephone, but not 2-1. It's 10-2-1. It refers to a telephone.

  • And the witness suggested --

  • Sorry, whose telephone? Whose telephone is 10-2-1?

  • Madam President, I am saying that the equipment, a phone, generally, be it a cell phone or a land phone, a phone generally is referred to in the universal police code as 10-2-1. Some might say 10-21, but it's either 10-2-1 or 10-21. That is a phone as a whole.

  • I don't know why we are talking about the universal police code. I thought we were talking about codes between - or codes used by the Government of Liberia at that time. Was this one of them? Did the Government of Liberia refer to their telephones as 10-2-1?

  • I mentioned the universal police code because this code 2-1 being referred to as a satellite phone or a phone has been made mention of here, so I'm giving a clear indication and what I'm saying is that 10-2-1 is a universal police code referring to a telephone.

  • I understood that. I'm just asking you did the Government of Liberia also use 10-2-1 in this manner?

  • Yes. The Government of Liberia communication used 10-2-1 in this manner for a telephone.

  • Mr Witness, this universal police code, 10-2-1 that is used to refer to a telephone, is that a secret code or is that a code known by police agencies around the world?

  • In this manner, I don't regard it to be a secret code because it is well known by every security organisation. So it is not a secret code. But what I want to make clear here is that when I was at Base 1, whenever the operators wanted to disseminate information to Buedu, telling Sam Bockarie, they will say 50 wants to get to him on the telephone, or that he should get to 50 on the telephone - what they will simply say is that, the Subject here wants Master or your Subject to get to him on the other side, because they wanted to avoid this well-known code, 2-1 or 10-2-1.

  • Thank you, Mr Witness. On the page where we left off, the witness made reference to the radio with the call sign 020 and said that's Charles Taylor's radio at the Executive Mansion Ground in Monrovia. Mr Witness, did Charles Taylor have a radio at the Executive Mansion Ground in Monrovia with the call sign 020?

  • First of all, I will start by saying that the President did not have a radio, but the Special Security Service at the Executive Mansion had a radio communication. And secondly, there was no code for the Executive Mansion referred to as 0 or Base 0 or 020. The code of the Executive Mansion was Proton. It was Proton from 1997 and Proton until 2003 when I left the Special Security Service.

  • Thank you, Mr Witness. Can we go to page 6922, please. Same day's transcript, 8 April 2008. Starting at line 9, the witness gave a response to a question. The question was:

    "Q. Now, how do you know all of this?

    A. When I crossed into Liberia, I knew that Unit 50 was

    Benjamin D Yeaten and that call sign 020 referring to the

    principal was no other person but the President.

    Q. Now, before you even crossed over to Liberia, did you

    yourself field or receive any of these calls?

    A. I received the call and the station sergeant was

    immediately informed and I went to have the principal

    informed. That was Log, Sam Bockarie. And they went on

    the telephone, they had conversations and whilst they were

    conversing he could respond, say, 'Yes, sir. Yes, sir.'

    And thereafter he could come on the radio to prepare

    messages to be transmitted to the front lines.

    Q. Now when you say you received the call, are you

    referring to only one call?

    A. It was not one call. Sometimes twice a day, sometimes

    one. In fact we used to receive a call and where there was

    an operation going on on the front lines.

    Q. Now I am talking about you yourself as an operator at

    the time. Did you receive these calls?

    A. Yes, sir.

    Q. You did. Now talking about the calls from 020, how

    would they be initiated?"

    And then we go to the next page, line 2:

    "A. They could call us. Sometimes if our call sign - when

    it was Bravo Zulu 4 they could call, '020 calling for

    Bravo Zulu 4,' and we could respond and in response they

    could tell us, 'Have your principal informed to get on the

    2-1, that the chief is on the 2-1 the talk to him,' and the

    message would be relayed to Sam Bockarie."

    Let's pause there. Mr Witness, what I read just now, in the previous page, that Prosecution witness was suggesting that the communication from Liberia, in particular 020, and Sierra Leone, was quite frequent. The witness said sometimes twice a day, sometimes once. And the witness referred to them preparing messages to be transmitted to the front lines after they had heard from 020. Are you following me?

    Now, you were at Base 1 and before that you were at the Executive Mansion. Starting in 1997, when you were at the Executive Mansion, until 2003, when you finished service at Base 1, did you know any of the radios within the Government of Liberia network to be in such frequent daily communication with the RUF in Sierra Leone?

  • I did not know any radio of the Government of Liberia being in a singular communication with the RUF.

  • When you were at Base 1, at Benjamin Yeaten's house, did you communicate with the RUF on a frequent basis when the RUF was engaged in operations, front line operations?

  • When I was at Base 1, the operators at Base 1 were not in frequent communication with the RUF. And, secondly, they were not in communication with the RUF in connection to any other military operations there. They called the RUF, especially Bravo Zulu 4 because when I say the RUF I will be making it general, the communication was strictly between Bravo Zulu 4 and Base 1 and every call that they made to Bravo Zulu 4 was in relation to instruction given to their boss by Unit 50 or Benjamin Yeaten asking them to either tell Sam to call him or to tell Sam to switch on his phone or sometimes once a while tell Sam that he was sending Sampson or Jungle to him, that is, to Sam Bockarie. But there was no other communication in relation to what they called operation.

  • Well, let me put it quite bluntly because this witness has said that when Sam Bockarie went on the telephone, Sam Bockarie would respond to the effect of, "Yes, sir, yes, sir." And that thereafter, Sam Bockarie would come on the radio and prepare messages to be transmitted to the front lines. The implication here basically is that Sam Bockarie was receiving instructions about what to do at the front lines when he had this radio - when he had this telephone communications with Benjamin Yeaten. You follow me? The question is, to your knowledge, was Benjamin Yeaten effectively directing RUF front line operations by giving orders to Sam Bockarie over the telephone?

  • It's not to my knowledge. It's not to my knowledge, even though, like I said, Benjamin Yeaten used to call Sam Bockarie on the telephone, but it's not to my knowledge that he instructed Sam Bockarie on military operations or what have you.

  • Did he used to call Sam Bockarie on the telephone more than once a day, for example?

  • Oh, yes. After Sam Bockarie's first visit to Monrovia in 1998, in September or October of 1998, Ben used to call Sam Bockarie on the telephone, sometimes twice a day, but in 1999, the calls that I used to observe were less frequent.

  • Thank you, Mr Witness. Now, we are at page 6923, one point there to clarify, starting at line 8, there is a question posed to the witness:

    "Q. Now, here you have just given an example using Bravo

    Zulu 4. In your earlier testimony, you said that in your

    earlier testimony you said this was the previous call sign

    for Bockarie's radio; is that correct?

    A. Yes, sir.

    Q. So if you got a call on Bravo Zulu 4, it means that

    call came before a certain time, a certain period in time.

    Is that right?

    A. Yes.

    Q. It would be before what time?

    A. Before the operation in Voinjama, because the call sign

    changed to Planet 1 when the operation in Voinjama was

    carried out and those recruits brought to Buedu. That was

    the time the call sign changed."

    Mr Witness, you're following the issue?

  • Yes.

  • This witness told the Court that at some point in time, Sam Bockarie's radio was referred to as Bravo Zulu 4 and then there was an operation in Voinjama and after that the call sign changed to Planet 1. Now, what is your recollection, which name preceded which, speaking now of Sam Bockarie's radio? Was it first called Bravo Zulu 4 or was it first called Planet 1?

  • Okay. Speaking on this, when communication started between Bravo Zulu 4 or Buedu and Base 1, it first started with the operator's code, like I said, Sellay, that was how he was referred to, and then later Sellay gave the call sign for Buedu to be Planet 1 and then later, we used the call sign Bravo Zulu 4, and I was saying that both call signs were used in communication. Base 1 either used Bravo Zulu 4 or Planet 1 and then they would respond.

  • So are you saying that Sam Bockarie's radio's call sign was first Planet 1 and then changed to Bravo Zulu 4?

  • Yes. Planet 1 was the call sign of the radio that Base 1 started communication with and then later, Bravo Zulu 4 came in.

  • Thank you. Continuing with the next question:

    "Q. Now, when there was a call from 020 and indicating

    that they wanted Log to go on the 2-1, who would come on

    the 2-1 to speak to Log?

    A. They made reference to the chief. The operator could

    make reference to the chief by telling us on the radio to

    have Log informed to go on the telephone and Log was

    Sam Bockarie in the code and the chief they were referring

    to was Charles Taylor.

    Q. Now, how did you know that he would be speaking to

    Charles Taylor?"

    Let's pause there and just focus on the issue of the chief. Mr Witness, how was the President of Liberia referred to on the telephone during radio communications, generally, within the Government of Liberia?

  • Okay. Generally, within the Government of Liberia, the President was referred to, within the SSS network, as either Gentleman or Unit 1, and on the VHF radio he was referred to as 4-0-7.

  • Was the President of Liberia ever referred to as "chief" on the radio?

  • No. On the radio, we were trying to cover the identity of the President, or every personnel on the radio. So when we said chief, which means we were not covering the identity. So we used code to cover the person's identity and the code was either 4-0-7 or Unit 1 or Gentleman.

  • Last Tuesday, on the 24th, at page 47036 of the transcript of the 24th, I asked you a question about the phrase "chief" and you said, in your answer, "Sampson was referring to the director of the SSS, you know, in Liberia, every high-ranking officer was referred to as chief by his subordinates. He was referring to the director, Benjamin Yeaten." That's what you said on Tuesday. And now, we have this transcript saying that "chief" meant Charles Taylor.

    That word "chief" in common parlance in Liberia, when you communicate, does it generally mean someone of superior authority?

  • In the common setting in Liberia, when we are referring to a superior on an electronic device, especially like the VHF or USF radio, every high-ranking person or a superior was referred to as a chief. Even a squad leader for a company is referred to by his elements as chief.

  • So would it - under these circumstances that you've spoken about, would it serve any purpose to have a code name for someone on the radio as "chief", given the various meanings that that name connotes?

  • I don't know for other people. I can't speak for other people. But for the Government of Liberia and the radio communication system within the Government of Liberia, it was not necessary for us to refer to any of our superiors as "chief" on the radio.

  • Thank you. May we go to page 6937, also on 8 April 2008. Thank you. Line 21, a question was posed to the same witness, TF1-516:

    "Q. Now, did you follow the activities of the group in

    Freetown until the end of that operation?

    A. We were serving duty and sometimes it was not on duty -

    sometimes I was not on duty. At times I was on duty, but

    I could read the details from the message book.

    Q. Now, during the course of this operation in Freetown

    and you were at Buedu, do you recall any communication by

    Sam Bockarie - by Bockarie with any other persons outside

    Sierra Leone?

    A. He was in persistent communication with 020 and Base

    1."

    Over to the next page, page 6938.

    "Q. Do you recall what was the subject of the

    communications he had with those two stations?

    A. Okay. Having heard the message about the release of

    the prisoners from Pademba Road Prison and those that were

    released were the former President of Sierra Leone, Joseph

    Saidu Momoh, one Walter Nicholls, Dr Lee, a man who

    established a network, African BBC, Hilton Fyle, Victor Foh

    and some others. This message was transmitted. In fact,

    it was not transmitted. Base 1 intercepted that

    communication and later on called and 50 was called to come

    on the radio and to talk to our principal. Our principal

    requested to talk to 50 and the message was transmitted by

    Sunlight."

  • "To Sunlight".

  • Yes, thank you, Madam President.

  • "...to Sunlight. Sunlight made available his principal and

    50 came on the radio and then Sam Bockarie was

    congratulated. He said, 'I have heard, I have got the

    information.' He said 'Congratulations. Job well done.'

    Q. But would you like to explain this again, using more

    the names of the persons who communicated rather than their

    code names?

    A. Sunlight.

    Q. Sunlight, meaning the operator for -

    A. The operator for call sign Base 1.

    Q. That is whose radio?

    A. Benjamin Yeaten's radio, the SSS director.

    Q. So what happened? What did Sunlight do?

    A. It was a conversation that was conducted between 50 and

    Sam Bockarie. '50' referring to Benjamin D Yeaten."

    At line 29:

    "Q. What was the conversation about?"

    The following page, page 6939:

    "A. Sunlight monitored that conversation and reported to

    his commander, and then a request was made for 50 to get on

    the radio, because we told him that, oh, this message had

    already been received by Base 1.

    Q. Which message did Sunlight monitor?

    A. The release of the prisoners from Pademba Road Prison

    and whilst communicating with - that was Gullit's station,

    communicating with Sam Bockarie's radio station, whilst

    communicating and Sunlight intercepted that communication.

    Q. From Liberia?

    A. From Liberia, and said he had got all necessary

    details, okay? Sam Bockarie was then informed about this

    message and then he came on set requesting to talk to 50 on

    the other side and 50 came on the radio. They had that

    radio conversation and, in that conversation, 50

    congratulated Sam Bockarie that indeed he had got all the

    details, his radio operator had briefed him about all that

    was communicated on that radio.

    Q. What details? What did he specifically say about that?

    A. 50 stated that he had had the message of the release of

    the prisoners from Pademba Road Prison, including

    ex-President Joseph Saidu Momoh.

    Q. Now, how did Sunlight, or how was Sunlight able to

    monitor this message that was being communicated by Gullit

    to Sam Bockarie, the initial message? How was Sunlight

    able to monitor that?

    A. Sunlight, like I said earlier, had access to our radio

    net. They knew almost all our frequencies. There was

    nothing hidden from them on our radio network."

    Let's pause. Mr Witness, you follow what this witness testified about? There was a radio communication between someone called Gullit and Sam Bockarie. This witness said that Sunlight intercepted that message, the message concerned the release of prisoners from Pademba Road, prisoners, including - this was a prison, Pademba Road Prison - including the former President of Sierra Leone, Joseph Saidu Momoh, someone named Walter Nicholls, Dr Lee, Victor Foh, Hilton Fyle and the rest; that Benjamin Yeaten already received that intercepted message from Sunlight, and, by the time it came when Yeaten and Bockarie finally spoke, Yeaten was congratulating Sam Bockarie. Let's pause there.

    You were at Base 1 during the critical time period, late 1998 through 2003. Did you ever know of Base 1 intercepting a message concerning the release of prisoners from Pademba Road?

  • No. When I was at Base 1, and when it comes to radio interception by Sunlight on the RUF net, Sunlight only intercepted radio communication within the RUF net between Sam Bockarie and Foday Sankoh in late 1999. And I stated that here yesterday. But that besides, there was no such communication that was intercepted by Sunlight or Dew, or whoever at Base 1 at the time, regarding prisoner matters or whatsoever matter. And, secondly, let me address this issue of Ben talking to Sam Bockarie on the radio. The witness said that, but what was put in place and what was happening within that time was that Benjamin Yeaten did not know the communication code. That is number 1. And number 2, he was afraid of interception because his relationship with Sam Bockarie was something that he kept secret, and he was afraid that he did not want the Government of Liberia, or the President, or anybody in Liberia, to know about it. So, even with regards to the Liberian operation, Benjamin Yeaten never spoke on the radio with anyone. So he never spoke with Sam Bockarie or anyone on the radio in Sierra Leone, even though that witness said so. But that never happened when I was there.

    And, lastly, the witness is always linking a call sign 020 or 02 with that of Base 1. Base 1's operation was not in cooperation with any Government of Liberia call sign or radio. Base 1 operators were strongly warned and informed by their boss, who instructed them to communicate with the RUF, that this communication should not be disclosed to any other radio operator or anybody in Liberia. So there was no cooperation. But I'm saying that that witness is trying to link other radio stations in Liberia with Base 1, that they were contacting the RUF. Thank you.

  • Thank you, Mr Witness. When you were assigned to Base 1, did you ever receive any radio messages in relation to somebody called Gullit?

  • I don't know whether that is a name or a code, but it's very strange to me.

  • Was there ever an occasion when Benjamin Yeaten congratulated Sam Bockarie over the radio at Base 1, the two of them speaking, Sam Bockarie in Buedu or somewhere in Sierra Leone, and Benjamin Yeaten at Base 1, congratulating Sam Bockarie?

  • First of all, please be informed that there was no occasion that Benjamin Yeaten ever spoke on the radio with anybody.

  • Thank you, Mr Witness. Now, the last question on that page, line 29, question to the witness:

    "Q. Now in your experience was this the first time that a

    Liberian radio was monitoring communications within the RUF

    locally?"

    We are now at page 6940. That witness says:

    "A. No.

    Q. Do you recall any other situation?

    A. Yes, I can recall at some point in time, in Kono, when

    we were about to pull out.

    Q. When was this?

    A. That was in 1998.

    Q. About when in 1998?

    A. Sometime in February 1998 after the intervention in

    Freetown.

    Q. Right.

    A. Okay. Gullit commanded" --

  • May I interrupt? I'm having problem with my LiveNote, suddenly got a message, and I clicked on it, it is kind of frozen. I'm not getting a feed now.

  • Your Honour, I'll contact the technicians and we will look into this. I also seem to be experiencing a message - this kind of message.

  • I must observe, though, we have the same similar message but LiveNote is running, in spite of the message.

  • There is a pointer flashing. I was minded to reboot, but the problem I had this morning was that I couldn't even log in, so I'm a bit apprehensive of doing that. I don't want to get into a situation where I can't even get out and get in again.

  • Now, my LiveNote has completely disappeared. I don't know. Madam Court Manager, how should we proceed?

  • Your Honour, I am contacting the technician, but in the meantime, I can get him to broadcast my LiveNote, which is also experiencing some problems but at least it's still functional presently.

    Actually, the pressing of the transcript button - pressing the transcript button would afford the parties and the Chamber an opportunity to view LiveNote, which is streamed from the booth.

    Your Honour, the problem with that solution is that apparently, if the booth broadcasts - if this is what we view, then they are not able to broadcast the feed from the courtroom. This is what the outside world would be viewing as well. But the technician is here with us now.

    Your Honour, I'm informed by the booth that they it continue their normal operations even if the participants in the courtroom are viewing LiveNote, on having pressed the transcript button.

  • The LiveNote of the Bench's is fine. Mr Bangura, are you still having problems with your LiveNote?

  • Yes, your Honour, it's still frozen, in the same position, but I have the broadcast from Madam Court Manager on. I should mention also that my case manager has a similar problem; her LiveNote completely went blank.

  • In any event, I'm going to ask Mr Anyah to continue, if you're able to, using the LiveNote that has been broadcast.

  • Thank you, Madam President. My LiveNote seems to be working fine, but I also have access to the LiveNote being published by the Court Manager.

  • Mr Witness, let me repeat the transcript I was reading, page 6940. The witness was asked about other examples when a Liberian radio was monitoring communications within the RUF. The witness answers at line 5:

    "A. Yes, I can recall at some point in time in Kono, when

    we were about to pull out.

    Q. When was this?

    A. That was in 1998.

    Q. About when in 1998?

    A. Sometime in February of 1998 after the intervention in

    Freetown.

    Q. Right.

    A. Okay. Gullit commanded all the soldiers in Kono to

    retreat to Kailahun. Then whilst they were communicating

    this message, Sunlight intercepted that communication and

    asked why were we pulling out from Kono when the other

    forces were still around Freetown, Makeni and some other

    areas. Then Gullit responded by saying that he had

    something very important to be discussed with Sam Bockarie

    and he insisted that we must set him for Kailahun and that

    was what exactly we did.

    Q. So this was the situation where Sunlight from Liberia

    monitored directly what was going on internally within the

    RUF?

    A. Yes, sir.

    Q. Now, apart from the present situation that we are

    discussing, that - the Freetown situation, apart from

    congratulating Sam Bockarie, did Benjamin Yeaten say

    anything else in their conversation?

    A. He sent a message of congratulations, that he has done

    so well and he had had the message."

    Let's pause there. Mr Witness, you listened to what I have just read. This witness told the Court that in February of 1998, sometime during that month, during what he referred to - he said:

    "After the intervention in Freetown, that Sunlight intercepted a communication and that Sunlight actually asked why they were pulling out from Kono when the other forces were still around Freetown."

    Now, you were assigned at the Executive Mansion in February 1998 on the basis of what you've told us. Are you aware, during that period of time, of Sunlight intercepting any radio communication involving Gullit in Sierra Leone?

  • I'm not aware of Sunlight intercepting communication with anybody in Sierra Leone in February of 1998, and again, in February 1998, Sunlight was assigned at the Executive Mansion, not under the direct supervision of Benjamin Yeaten. He was assigned at the Executive Mansion and there was no radio communication link between the Executive Mansion or the Government of Liberia in February of 1998, to the best of my knowledge, there was no radio communication between Sunlight and the RUF. And, secondly, when Sunlight started communicating with the RUF, based upon the directive of his boss, the SSS director, Benjamin Yeaten, at which time he had not been assigned to Benjamin Yeaten as radio operator, he was instructed that the communication from Base 1 to the RUF-controlled was directly to Buedu and that was Sam Bockarie. So Sunlight was not communicating - Sunlight was not meddling into the RUF affairs. He was acting upon the directive of his boss in his relationship with Sam Bockarie. So in February of 1998 Sunlight never communicated with anyone in Sierra Leone. Nor did he intercept any communication.

  • Was the radio with call sign Base 1 even in existence in February of 1998?

  • There was no call sign in February 1998 in Liberia called - or within the Government of Liberia radio communication, called Base 1.

  • Now, let's go to the next page, starting at line 1, that's page 6941. There was a question posed to that witness, still 8 April 2008. The question was:

    "Q. Was this a one-time communication only during the

    period that the operation was in Freetown - was going on?

    A. There were calls, a number of calls, that I cannot

    recall.

    Q. And what would be the subject of that communication in

    these calls?

    A. Calls sometimes from Sam Bockarie was situation report

    from the front line and sometimes making requisition for

    materials, that is, ammunitions. In transmitting this

    message, he could come on the radio set and ask us to call

    Base 1 and we could call Base 1, the operator could respond

    and then he, 50 - and then 50 could come on the radio and

    then Sam Bockarie could can tell 50 that he was hungry,

    meaning --"

    And then a question is interposed. Now, Mr Witness, you've heard what I have read.

  • Yes, sir, I've heard it.

  • It has to do with communication around the time there was an operation in Freetown. The witness says there were a number of calls and then the witness said:

    "Calls sometimes from Sam Bockarie was situation report from the front lines and sometimes making requisition for materials."

    Now, to your knowledge, did Sam Bockarie, and let's focus first on the radio, send radio messages, numerous messages, indeed, to Benjamin Yeaten during some operation the RUF had in Freetown, that its contents were in the nature of situation reports by Sam Bockarie to Benjamin Yeaten? Do you recall any such messages at Base 1?

  • To my knowledge at the time, at Base 1, there was no form of situation report given to Benjamin Yeaten by Sam Bockarie on any occasion on the radio. And like I said, Sam Bockarie and Benjamin Yeaten never spoke to each other on the radio, as far as I'm concerned.

  • Thank you. You heard reference to the phrase, "Hungry", that the witness said Sam Bockarie could tell 50 that, "He was hungry." Have you ever heard use of that type of language when Buedu communicated with Base 1?

  • I never heard that language on the radio.

  • Thank you, Mr Witness. We continue with the transcript, line 18, question:

    "Q. Were there further other communications, apart from

    the one in which Gullit's message was intercepted? Were

    there other communications between Bockarie and Yeaten?

    A. Yes.

    Q. What was the substance? What was the subject of those

    communications?"

    And then we have the answer:

    "A. When the AFRC/RUF retreated there was a free flow of

    combatant, AFRC/RUF, crossing into Liberia. So Bockarie

    travelled down to Liberia and had a discussion with

    Benjamin D Yeaten that no armed AFRC/RUF must be allowed to

    cross into Liberia, that they must tighten up their

    borders, okay, and that there was a shortage of manpower

    because a good number of them have crossed into Liberia."

    We are now at page 6942:

    "A. So 50 again commanded Sam Bockarie to open a training

    base to recruit civilians and that was implemented. The

    place was opened right there in Bunumbu Mababo.

    Q. Now, apart from communications with Benjamin Yeaten's

    radio, Base 1, during the Freetown invasion period was

    there communication with any other station by Sam Bockarie?

    A. Yes, sir, 020."

    Let's pause there.

    Mr Witness, I don't know if you are following this. The reference here is to the invasion of Freetown. The witness is saying that at some point what the witness refers to as AFRC/RUF retreated. And while they were retreating there was a free flow of combatants crossing into Liberia, that Sam Bockarie travelled down to Liberia and spoke to Yeaten, asking Yeaten to tighten up their borders.

    Now, Mr Witness, have you ever heard anything similar to this happening; that Sam Bockarie travelled into Liberia and asked Yeaten to tighten up their borders? Were you privy to such an occurrence?

  • I did not hear of anything like that or see anything like that at the time.

  • Did you receive any radio messages or communications that suggested that Liberia had to tighten up its borders because there was a shortage of manpower and a good number of retreating combatants had entered into Liberia?

  • Are you aware of Benjamin Yeaten ever ordering Sam Bockarie to open up a training base to recruit civilians?

  • I am not aware of that.

  • Thank you. Continuing where we left off, page 6942, line 9:

    "Q. And how was this communication initiated?

    A. 020 called on our radio frequency requesting Bockarie

    to go on the 2-1.

    Q. That is over the period of the Freetown invasion?

    A. Yes, sir.

    Q. And what happened after that?

    A. After their telephone conversation Bockarie could then

    come on the radio and draft message instructing commanders

    as how best to manoeuvre to capture areas and Bockarie

    could tell us that he had had contact with his chief.

    Q. Now, in the particular Freetown situation, and not

    other situations where there had been communications, what

    specifically did Bockarie order his troops, meaning Gullit

    in Freetown, after the conversation on the 2-1?

    A. He could instruct Gullit to set ambushes to go on

    attacks like that.

    Q. Was this a one-off communication on the 2-1? Was it a

    one-off communication?

    A. No. No, sir.

    Q. How do you know this?

    A. I was there myself."

    Let's pause. Mr Witness, you've spoken about the absence of a radio with a call sign 020. So let's set that aside. To your knowledge, around the time of the Freetown invasion, around January 6, 1999, was there any communication on a regular basis with any Government of Liberia radio in the vicinity of the Executive Mansion and the RUF rebels in Sierra Leone?

  • No.

  • When you say no, what do you mean?

  • When I said no, it means that in the first place there was no radio at the Executive Mansion to my knowledge with the call sign 020, and the Executive Mansion was totally innocent - ignorant of the relationship between Benjamin Yeaten and the RUF. And secondly, during the time of the Freetown invasion in January, Base 1, which used to be in communication with the RUF, never had any communication with the RUF radio or with Buedu within the month of January, not at all.

  • Do you remember when you testified you told us that Sam Bockarie, during his second visit to Liberia, was seen with a mobile - a satellite telephone by Sunlight?

  • That's correct.

  • This was in late 1998?

  • This witness was telling the Court that in January 1999, during the Freetown invasion, someone from 020 would radio to tell Sam Bockarie to put on his satellite telephone and that Sam Bockarie would then have a telephone conversation. And after that, Sam Bockarie would then go on the radio and would draft messages instructing his commander or his commanders about how best to manoeuvre to capture areas and that Sam Bockarie - the witness used the phrase - could tell us that he had had contact with his chief.

    Are you aware of the President of Liberia calling Sam Bockarie on a satellite telephone during January 1996 to give instructions about how Sam Bockarie should manoeuvre at the front lines? Are you aware of any of this happening?

  • I'm not aware, and when I was at - I was on Yeaten's duty as one of his securities, I did not know - in fact, I was not close to the President either. And even when I was also at the Executive Mansion, I was not close to the President. Every radio operator at the Executive Mansion was not close to the President, so I did not know whether the President had communication, be it on the telephone or whatsoever phone, with Sam Bockarie.

  • Thank you, Mr Witness. Shall we go over --

  • Can I just ask one question of the witness that you haven't asked, Mr Anyah?

  • And that is in relation to this allegation or the evidence that you read that in January 1999, there was communication between Sam Bockarie and the radio station 020. Now, Mr Witness, are you aware whether, in January 1999, Sam Bockarie communicated with Sky 1?

  • It's not to my knowledge. I don't know. I don't know. In January 1999, if I'm not mistaken, I believe the ATU was still undergoing their training, and they were - they had just come up and Sky 1 was not on the radio. What I learnt about Sky 1 was that he became a member of the ATU during the second batch of training. He was a member of the second batch of the ATU recruits, so I don't think Sky 1 might have been on the ATU radio or at the Executive Mansion at any time at this point. Maybe --

  • Your Honours, could the witness be asked to slow down and repeat from where I stopped.

  • Mr Witness, you've gone too fast. You were explaining. You said maybe - you started to saying, "He was a member of the second batch of ATU recruits, so I don't think he would have been on the ATU radio or at the Executive Mansion at any time at this point." What did you say after that?

  • What I'm saying is that Sky 1 was a member of the second batch of ATU recruits, and I believe the second batch came in sometime after January or February of 1999, because in 1998, even at the end of 1998, the SSU was still in session. There was no ATU in 1998 because the SSU was used by the Special Security Service to join like the AFL to combat Roosevelt Johnson who attacked the government during the Camp Johnson Road incident on September 18. So if the SSU was still in existence at that time, then I'm not sure of the ATU being operational in early 1999. So that is what I am fighting over.

  • Thank you. Mr Anyah, we will take our luncheon break now and reconvene at 2.30.

  • [Lunch break taken at 1.33 p.m.]

  • [Upon resuming at 2.32 p.m.]

  • Good afternoon. Mr Anyah, please continue.

  • Thank you, Madam President.

  • Good afternoon, Mr Witness.

  • Good afternoon, sir.

  • Before the luncheon adjournment we were considering the testimony of a Prosecution witness. May I ask that we revisit the transcript again of 8 April 2008, starting at page number 6972 please. Now, line 8 on that page, the question was posed to the witness, the witness testifying is still TF1-516:

    "Q. What did you go to do at Gbarnga?

    A. He took me to the President's farm . He was there to

    attend a meeting, but when he first collected me from Foya,

    we flew to Gbarnga, he had a radio which we mounted his

    residence, or let us say his house at the President's farm

    Q. Where?

    A. In Gbarnga.

    Q. Right.

    A. From there I established communication with his station

    and where he requested for some materials and the other day

    we set him for Tenembu.

    Q. Can you just pause. You went to Gbarnga and you said

    you set up a radio there, is that correct?

    A. Yes, sir.

    Q. And after setting up the radio you established

    communication with where?

    A. With Base 1. Base 1 and telling Network - there was a

    man called Network, who was Joe Tuah, he was referred to as

    Network, Joe Tuah. Then he enquired from Joe Tuah to tell

    him about the movement of the helicopter with materials to

    his location and that Bulldog was in charge, he was to

    effect the movement of the 'iron bird' to his location. I

    remained there and the communication was facilitated."

    We are now at page 6973:

    "Then the helicopter came with materials. Then we set in

    for Tenembu.

    Q. Did you hear this communication by Yeaten? Did you

    hear this - how was this message communicated?

    A. He told me to have Sunlight informed that he was in

    Gbarnga and that Network should facilitate the movement of

    the iron bird with materials to his location.

    Q. I get it, but how was it communicated? How did you

    send this message? Was it by radio?

    A. By radio."

    Just pause there. This Prosecution witness was essentially telling the Court that, first, he, the witness, went to Gbarnga with Benjamin Yeaten, that he installed a radio at Yeaten's residence within the President's farm in Gbarnga, that at some point in time he established communication with Base 1 and that Joe Tuah, also known as Network, was inquired of regarding the movement of a helicopter with materials to their location. The witness went on to say that the witness, who appears to have been the radio operator, was told by Yeaten to tell Sunlight that Yeaten was in Gbarnga and that Network should facilitate the movement of the iron bird with materials to Yeaten's location.

    Now, Mr Witness, you were at Base 1. Do you recall such a message from a radio operator with Benjamin Yeaten in Gbarnga; that is, to the effect that a helicopter should be sent with materials to Benjamin Yeaten in Gbarnga?

  • It is not to my knowledge.

  • More specifically - and you know who this witness is, you don't have to mention that witness's name.

  • Did you ever receive a message from TF1-516 that was sent by Benjamin Yeaten instructing those at Base 1 to advise Joe Tuah, also known as Network, to send materials with the helicopter to Gbarnga?

  • I want to make it clear that this particular witness that you've just mentioned was at no point in time used by Benjamin Yeaten to operate a radio on his behalf, on Benjamin 's behalf.

  • Thank you, Mr Witness. Can we go to page --

  • Mr Witness, how would you know that, because this is something happened in Gbarnga? How would you know to rule it out?

  • Yes, I would know because at Base 1, I was very close to Sunlight. Sunlight was the chief of radio communication to Benjamin Yeaten. And also, when Jungle Fire was reactivated, he was also the head of radio of the radio operators for Jungle Fire. And every radio operator that was assigned to Benjamin Yeaten on the front line was well-known by Sunlight. And everything at Base 1, I was there, I monitored it, I observed it, and at any point in time, even if a stray Liberian operator operated for Ben, I would have to know. So there was no occasion that Ben ever used any strange operator, be it Sierra Leonean or Liberian, to operate on his behalf, with the exception of those that were known to Sunlight. And Sunlight did not receive any information from this - from this witness in question.

  • Mr Witness, one other question in respect of the transcript I just read. The Prosecution witness referred to the mounting of a radio at Benjamin Yeaten's residence, or house, at the President's farm in Gbarnga. Did Benjamin Yeaten have a house within the President's farm in Gbarnga?

  • I don't know whether Benjamin Yeaten had - has a house in the President's farm in Gbarnga.

  • Are you aware of Benjamin Yeaten having a radio mounted in the vicinity of the President's house in Gbarnga? That is, a radio mounted at the place where Benjamin Yeaten was staying in Gbarnga?

  • I am not aware of that, and I was not informed. Any time that Benjamin Yeaten either has a radio or had a radio mounted in Gbarnga, if that was the case, I would have known. But what I know was that Benjamin Yeaten had a mobile radio, a front line radio, and he was not based in Gbarnga. When the LURD - I don't know when this witness is speaking about, but Benjamin Yeaten was never based in Gbarnga. Gbarnga had a radio with a call sign of 38. If there was any information, even if Ben was in Gbarnga, that he wanted to pass to Monrovia, either to Base 1 or to the Executive Mansion, he would use 38. While he was at the Jungle Fire, the front line radio was at the front line.

  • Thank you, Mr Witness. Madam Court Manager, may we go to the following day's transcript, 9 April 2008, starting at page 7003.

    Mr Witness, listen to what I am about to read. Line 2, there is a question posed by Justice Sebutinde: "So the house belongs to 50, or to the President, the house on the farm?" The witness answers: "That house belongs to 50."

    Then question:

    "Q. Now, what was the focus of your assignment in Liberia

    at this time?"

    Line 9:

    "A. I was instructed to meet 50 to enhance smooth

    operations. That was to communicate a request for manpower

    from the RUF, and when there was a request made for

    materials or ammunition to be transported to Foya, I made

    report about that to General Issa Sesay.

    Q. And you said that when you arrived - before you left

    Sierra Leone you were given a code. Is that right?

    A. Yes, sir.

    Q. Who gave you this code?

    A. From the headquarter.

    Q. Who gave it to you?

    A. Before leaving it was Alfred Brown who was the overall

    signal commander for the RUF, okay? So, whenever an

    operator was assigned to travel from one point to another

    on a mission, you were given a radio set, which comprises

    pen, stationery and the code chart.

    Q. And who gave this material to you in this situation in

    this case?

    A. The overall signal commander.

    Q. Alfred Brown?

    A. Yes, sir."

    Let's pause. Mr Witness, do you know an Alfred Brown?

  • No. I do not know any Alfred Brown.

  • Was there ever a time when you heard of an Alfred Brown being the overall signal commander for the RUF?

  • Is it possible that an Alfred Brown could have been the signal commander but because you communicated only with Buedu, you were not aware of that?

  • It may be, but I do not know.

  • But in the case of Buedu, was there ever a radio operator with the name Alfred Brown who operated out of Buedu when you were at Base 1?

  • No. There was no operator by the name of Alfred Brown that I knew about.

  • Okay. Over to the next page, page 7004, question, line 1:

    "Q. What were you supposed to do with the charts - the

    code chart - that was given to you.

    A. I was to use that code chart whenever I was

    communicating, transmitting messages.

    Q. With which radios were you supposed to be communicating

    when you were in Liberia?

    A. I had my own radio set and that was code named call

    sign 72.

    Q. And which radios were you supposed to be communicating

    with using your own radio?

    A. When I crossed into Liberia, I was to communicate with

    call sign 020 under the instructions of Benjamin D Yeaten,

    and call sign Base 1 and Foxtrot Yankee and the radio

    stations in Buedu.

    Q. The chart which you had, the code chart which you had

    before leaving Sierra Leone, was it available to radio

    operators on the other side?

    A. There was another code chart already, but when I was

    travelling I took along another code which was different

    from the one they were using.

    Q. So, what did you do with the one that you took?

    A. That was what I established and that was what I was

    using.

    Q. Were you the only one using that code chart?

    A. No, sir. All - whatever code chart was to be used was

    first distributed to all the stations.

    Q. And so was this chart distributed?

    A. The one I carried?

    Q. Yes.

    A. Yes, sir. A copy was handed over to Sunlight, call

    sign Base 1, and another copy was handed over to Sky 1 at

    call sign 020.

    Q. Who handed them copies?

    A. I handed over code chart to Sunlight, one copy, and the

    other copy to Sunlight.

    Q. Say again. You said Sunlight twice, I believe.

    A. Sunlight and Sky 1. Sunlight at call sign Base 1.

    That was Benjamin D Yeaten's radio.

    Q. And?

    A. And call sign 020, operated by Sky 1.

    Q. Now, where did you hand these charts to these

    operators?

    A. After the Voinjama operation, we travelled, or I

    travelled together with Benjamin D Yeaten to Monrovia, but

    before this we had another code which there was another

    code before distributing that code and that was what we

    were using."

    Just pause there. Mr Witness, what this operator is saying is that they had a radio set with the call sign 72 and they communicated with that radio to radios in Liberia with call signs 020, Base 1, Foxtrot Yankee, as well as with the radio stations in Buedu. Do you follow what I'm saying? Now, while you were at Base 1, were you ever in communication with another radio with the call sign 72 that was operated by TF1-516, the witness in question?

  • I don't know the call sign 72.

  • Did TF1-516 ever call Base 1 on the radio from a radio with the call sign 72? Did that ever happen?

  • I said I don't know the call sign 72, and I never heard the call sign 72.

  • Thank you. The witness went on to suggest that this witness, TF1-516, came along with a code that was different from the one that these radio stations had been using before, and that this new code was distributed. It says copies were given to Sky 1 and Sunlight.

    Mr Witness, do you recall any of this happening, that TF1-516, the person whose identity you know, that that person brought a new radio code and distributed it to Government of Liberia radio operators Sunlight and Sky 1? Did that happen? Were you following the question?

  • Please repeat it.

  • The question was: Do you recall whether TF1-516, the operator whose name you know, ever brought codes to Liberia and distributed those codes to Sunlight and Sky 1?

  • Never, never. This witness never distributed or handed a code chart or whatsoever code or frequency to Sunlight at any point in time. And once again, Benjamin Yeaten never had two groups of radio communications behind him. That is, he never had this call sign 72 or the call sign Mobile 1. Mobile 1 was the only radio that Benjamin had at the front line with him.

  • Thank you, Mr Witness. You heard me read what the witness said about a Voinjama operation and how that witness travelled, together with Benjamin D Yeaten, to Monrovia. Are you aware of that witness moving with Benjamin D Yeaten from Voinjama to Monrovia in relation to an operation in Voinjama?

  • I am not aware of it, and what I have to say again is - let me make it clear - this particular witness, after his trip, along with Sam Bockarie, during Sam Bockarie's second visit, okay, I never saw him again until Sam Bockarie - Sam Bockarie's final stay in Liberia during the late 1999.

  • Very well. Thank you. Mr Witness, also, as you speak of that witness, we have to be careful not to say too much in public session. If there is more you want to say about that witness, you can always ask me and I will apply to the Court that we go into a private session.

  • Okay, sir. Sorry.

  • Now, if we may continue at page 7005, line 15, there is a question posed to the witness:

    "Q. And so when you arrived at Monrovia, did you

    distribute the code?

    A. Yes, sir.

    Q. Where did you hand this code to the operator for call

    sign 020?

    A. I went to the Mansion Ground myself. I used to go to

    the Mansion Ground. This 020 I can remember, it was

    located at the fourth floor, room 306."

    Madam President, you will recall before the luncheon adjournment I made an assertion to the effect that this Prosecution witness claims to have handed Sky 1 the code at Base 1. I still stand by that assertion. We will come to it again when the witness makes a correction, and I think that is to be found around page 40 - either 34 or 45, but we will come to it. But, as of this page, the witness says that they went to the Mansion Ground themselves, and I will just let the transcript speak for itself.

    Now, line 23:

    "Q. And when you say 'the Mansion Ground' where are you

    referring to?

    A. The Executive Mansion Ground in Monrovia.

    Q. You said you went to the fourth floor of that building.

    A. Yes, sir. Let's say you have one, two, three, four.

    There I was taken to.

    Q. And where did you hand over the code to Sunlight?

    A. At Base 1. That was the small structure I spoke of

    just outside Benjamin D Yeaten's residence in Congo Town,

    Monrovia."

    Let's pause there. Mr Witness, a couple of matters to clarify. The witness told the Court that the radio with the call sign 020 was located in room 306, off the fourth floor of the Executive Mansion Ground. The witness was specific in saying the Executive Mansion Ground in Monrovia. That's room 306 of the fourth floor.

    A number of questions. One, the numbering of rooms in the Executive Mansion, you told us this morning that the ground floor in Liberia is often called the first floor. Is that what you told us this morning?

  • Yes, I said we refer - I said most of us refer to it as the first floor. In Liberia it is referred to as the first floor.

  • Now, rooms with the numbering sequence in the 300s, like, for example, room 306, on which floor of the Executive Mansion would rooms with such a numbering sequence be found?

  • I didn't take note of that, so I can't comment on that anyway, even though the rooms are numbered, but I didn't take any specific notice of that.

  • That's fair enough. Was there a radio on the fourth floor of the Executive Mansion with the code name or call sign 020?

  • No. The radio - the SSS radio on the fourth floor of the Executive Mansion had the call sign from 1997, when I was incorporated into the SSS, up to 2003 - up to 2003 the call sign was Proton and it remained Proton until I left the service.

  • Thank you, Mr Witness. The Prosecution witness said that they handed the code to Sunlight at Base 1, in particular in the small structure outside Benjamin D Yeaten's residence in Congo Town. That witness, as I have indicated before - and this is at page 7017 of 9 April 2008's transcript - that witness said they were in Liberia, starting around June/July of 1999, and they remained in Liberia until 2001. Can you remind us when again it was - the radio in Benjamin Yeaten's house was moved from his main residence, the big building, to the small building or structure that you say is outside the fence?

  • I can remember that the radio was transferred from the big building to the small building in the middle of 1999, but I can't remember the month.

  • Did that witness, TF1-516, to your knowledge, ever hand a radio code, set of codes, to Sunlight in that small building or structure?

  • No. It's never happened.

  • We continue with the transcript, line 4:

    "Q. You said from Gbarnga you moved after setting up

    communication there. Was some arrangement for the supply

    of materials from Benjamin Yeaten. Is that right?

    A. Yes, we remained in Gbarnga and he made that

    arrangement. It was very simple to relay and pass on

    information."

  • Could counsel please indicate the page.

  • Yes, page 7006, 9 April 2008. I apologise, Madam Court Manager, I had referred you to page 7017 previously. So that we're now at 7006, line 4.

  • "Q. Now, you said from Gbarnga you moved, after setting up

    communication there was some arrangement for the supply of

    material from Benjamin Yeaten. Is that right?

    A. Yes, we remained in Gbarnga and he made that

    arrangement. It was very simple to relay and pass on

    information and you had the helicopter flying to his

    location. The message was transmitted to Base 1 to Joe

    Tuah. The message was addressed to Joe Tuah, Network, and

    he was to collect Bulldog who was there to facilitate the

    movement of the helicopter to Gbarnga.

    Q. Now, who was Joe Tuah?

    A. Joe Tuah was a sort of administrator.

    Q. For who?

    A. For the Liberian government.

    Q. And the message was for him to contact, who do you say,

    Bulldog?

    A. The message was addressed to Joe Tuah, that is Network,

    from Benjamin D Yeaten, Unit 50, and that Joe Tuah was to

    meet Bulldog to facilitate the movement of the iron bird

    with materials to his location in Gbarnga.

    Q. Was the material brought to Gbarnga?

    A. Yes, sir.

    Q. To Yeaten?

    A. Yes, sir.

    Q. What brought the material to Gbarnga?

    A. The helicopter."

    Let's pause. Mr Witness, yesterday we saw a photograph of several members of the SSS and you identified Joe Tuah. Do you recall that?

  • Yes.

  • This witness refers to Joe Tuah as some sort of administrator for the Liberian Government. What was Joe Tuah's position at the time you were in Base 1?

  • Joe Tuah was an assistant director without portfolio. He did not have assignment.

  • The message that this witness speaks of, a message regarding Joe Tuah making arrangements to facilitate - Joe Tuah to meet with Bulldog to facilitate the movement of the iron bird with materials to Gbarnga, was that a message that those at Base 1 received from Benjamin Yeaten?

  • Those at Base 1 did not receive such a message from Benjamin Yeaten.

  • This is during the time period when you were at Base 1?

  • Yes, during the time period when I was at Base 1. And, when I was there, I do not remember a message being received from Benjamin Yeaten through the operator with him at the front line and to the operator at Base 1 for any requisition for a helicopter arrangement or ammunition arrangement.

  • Yes, you have just referred to Benjamin Yeaten being at the front line, but this witness was testifying to Gbarnga. This witness was saying the helicopter was to bring the materials to Gbarnga. How about Gbarnga? When Yeaten was in Gbarnga, was there ever such a message from him relayed to TF1-516 to those at Base 1 asking that they should get in touch with Joe Tuah and ask Joe Tuah to facilitate the movement of this helicopter to Gbarnga?

  • This witness was not used by Benjamin Yeaten anywhere, be it in Gbarnga or anywhere, to relay messages from Benjamin Yeaten to Base 1. He was not used at any point or at any time.

  • Madam Court Manager, may we go to 7001, please, starting at line 20, same day's transcript, 9 April 2008.

  • Mr Witness, listen to this:

    "Q. Do you recall what the nature of the communications

    was between Issa Sesay - you said he also communicated

    directly with Yeaten. What was the nature of his

    communications with Yeaten?

    A. In 2000, when General Issa Sesay took over, messages

    were now channelled directly to General Issa Sesay.

    Q. What was the subject of some of those messages?

    A. Similar messages, just as the messages transmitted when

    Sam Bockarie was there in power.

    Q. When you say 'similar', what do you mean?"

    Over to the next page, page 7012:

    "A. Requisition for materials, sending information of the

    dispatching of materials, or sending of materials to

    Foxtrot Yankee and movement of those personnel: Sampson

    Weah, Zigzag Marzah, or Dopoe, moving with ammunitions to

    his location. Issa Sesay was not staying in Buedu, but in

    Kono. He was permanently based in Kono when Sam Bockarie

    left for Liberia, when he crossed into Liberia.

    Q. Apart from communicating with Sierra Leone, with the

    radios in Sierra Leone from Liberia, did you communicate

    with radios within Liberia when you were with Benjamin

    Yeaten?

    A. Yes, sir.

    Q. What was the subject of the communication that you had

    with those radios?

    A. Within Liberia, instructions and making requisition of

    the flying of the iron bird to his location.

    Q. To whose location?

    A. To Benjamin D Yeaten's location. If he were in, let's

    say, Kolahun, then the message could be transmitted to have

    the network informed, that is Joe Tuah, to facilitate the

    movement of the Capricorn, that was another name of the

    helicopter, to facilitate the movement of the Capricorn to

    his location. And 50 was making requisition for ammunition

    and fuel, because he had motorbikes and some other jeeps in

    which he had artillery pieces mounted in.

    Q. Now, which radios would you communicate with?

    A. Base 1 and 020."

    Let's pause there. Mr Witness, the first part of the transcript I have just read, the witness said that when Issa Sesay took over the leadership of the RUF in 2000, essentially nothing changed in respect of how communication was occurring between Benjamin Yeaten and the RUF. Now, when Issa Sesay took over the leadership of the RUF, do you know whether he had any direct radio communication contact with Benjamin Yeaten and Base 1?

  • When Issa Sesay took over, he never had any radio communication or contact with Base 1 or with Benjamin Yeaten on the radio at Base 1. That is, immediately after the crossing over of Sam Bockarie into Liberia, finally in late 1999, I think I stated this yesterday, the last communications that were done in relation to Sam Bockarie and Base 1 was when Sampson called Base 1 from Voinjama and told Sunlight that he saw Sam Bockarie en route - while he, Sampson, was going to Sierra Leone he saw Sam Bockarie en route in a convoy but that Sam Bockarie did not stop.

    Okay, immediately after that communication there was no further communication made in relation to Sam Bockarie or in connection with the RUF. Every communication between Base 1 and Bravo Zulu 4 totally stopped, and it stopped for good. So there was no possibility for Issa Sesay to have spoken with Base 1 or with Benjamin Yeaten on the radio. There was no longer any communication between Buedu and that of Base 1. So definitely, to my knowledge, the relationship was between Sam Bockarie and Benjamin Yeaten.

  • How about communication with Kono? This witness says that Issa Sesay was not based in Buedu but was based in Kono. To your knowledge, did Base 1 have any communication with Issa Sesay in Kono, starting from around the year 2000?

  • Even starting from 2000 or before 2000, Base 1 never had communication with Issa Sesay either directly or indirectly. There was no communication between Issa Sesay and Base 1.

  • How about the movement of personnel? This witness referred to the movement of personnel, such as "Sampson Weah", Zigzag Marzah or Dopoe. Now, one or two questions. After Sam Bockarie settled in Liberia, that is came to take refuge? December of 1999, are you aware of Benjamin Yeaten sending either Jungle, Sampson Wehyee, or Zigzag Marzah into Sierra Leone for any purpose?

  • After Sam Bockarie's entry into Liberia, I never saw or heard any movement of Sampson Wehyee or Jungle into Sierra Leone by Ben's order or even by themselves, nothing.

  • How about Zigzag Marzah or a person called Dopoe? Were they, to your knowledge, ever sent into Sierra Leone by Benjamin Yeaten after the time Sam Bockarie came to settle in Liberia?

  • No.

  • Continue from where we left off, same page, 7012, line 27. There is a question:

    "Q. Who would 50 be communicating with?

    A. The President, and in fact 50 himself had a satellite

    phone at some point in time in Voinjama and in Voinjama he

    used to communicate every morning and every morning with

    his chief.

    Q. How did you know this?

    A. I was with him in the same house in Voinjama, in

    Kolahun in the same house.

    Q. How did you know that he was communicating with his

    chief?

    A. Talking to his chief he could say, 'Yes, sir', and

    explaining to him how fighting has gone so far on the front

    line.

    Q. What would you deduce from that? Just saying, 'Yes,

    sir'? What did you make of it?

    A. That he was speaking to his superior and that he was

    talking to his President and that was what he told me.

    Q. What else would he discuss on the phone with his chief?

    A. About the situation at the front line. Whenever there

    was an attack, Yeaten went on the telephone to have his

    chief informed.

    Q. Apart from speaking on the phone, you already have

    mentioned that there was radio communication with 020 and

    Sunlight when you were out in the field with Yeaten. When

    there was communication with 020 would you be involved in

    such communication as an operator?

    A. I was calling. I was on the set calling - I mean

    talking with the operator. Whenever there was a message,

    the message came through me and delivered to Benjamin D

    Yeaten and he was contacted to go on the telephone. Their

    communication was always on the telephone when they were in

    Voinjama.

    Q. Now, apart from calls which required Yeaten to go on

    the satellite phone, what would be the subject of radio

    communications between yourself, on behalf of Yeaten, and

    020?

    A. If a particular mission was successful he would tell me

    to prepare what we call a comprehensive report, a

    comprehensive report, and that was transmitted to 020.

    Q. What would be the messages that came from 020 to Yeaten

    as far as you remember?

    A. It was to go on the telephone and to discuss. And, in

    fact, I can remember one of the messages about the

    capturing. It was the bombardment of the Liberian

    territory by the Guinean helicopter gunship. That message

    I prepared and it was transmitted to 020. Then after, let

    us say after some time, I heard it on the BBC because it

    was the defence minister who reported about that bombing.

    The message came directly from 50, Benjamin D Yeaten, about

    the bombing of a Guinean helicopter gunship. They bombed a

    certain part of Liberia and that was the time the fighting

    was going on in Gueckedou, that is Guinea. So that message

    was prepared. It was 50 who gave me the authority to

    prepare that message about the bombing and the message was

    transmitted to 020. Then after some time it was heard on

    the BBC and it was the defence minister, Daniel Chea, who

    reported on that issue. But he was really not on the

    scene. The incident took place whilst fighting was going

    on in Guinea and Yeaten told me to prepare a comprehensive

    report about that incident."

    Let's pause. Mr Witness, from where I started reading you heard the witness say that Benjamin Yeaten spoke to someone on the radio and answered the person, "Yes, sir." And, from that, the person deduced that Yeaten was talking to his superior, this is in addition to Yeaten telling this witness, TF1-516, that Yeaten was talking to his superior.

    Now, while you were at Base 1, and while Benjamin Yeaten had the mobile radio Mobile 1, are you aware of any instance when the President of Liberia spoke directly with Benjamin Yeaten on the radio?

  • No, I am not aware. And furthermore --

  • Let me ask you another question.

  • Okay.

  • I apologise, but this would expedite matters as well. Forgetting the radio, about the telephone. Are you aware of the manner in which Benjamin Yeaten addressed the President of Liberia on the telephone, that is assuming they spoke on the telephone? Do you want me to break the question in two parts?

  • It is understood. Okay. Okay, let us me say the cell phone or mobile phone came into existence and most of the time that I used to be by Benjamin Yeaten when he was responding to the President, and whenever he responded to the President on the telephone, he always responds by adding a title to the President. That is, he would respond by saying, "Yes, sir, His Excellency, Mr President. Yes, sir, your Excellency, Mr President." That was his response and that was the title that he always attached to the President. But there was not a case that he only said, "Yes, sir." He always said, "Yes, sir, your Excellency, Mr President."

  • Now you heard of the witness talk of the transmitter of a comprehensive report to 020 - this is the station you said you had never heard of, 020. Setting that aside for a moment, was it the practice of Benjamin Yeaten to ask radio operators to transmit comprehensive reports, through the radio, to the Executive Mansion? This is at the time when Yeaten would be at the front lines.

  • That is not to my knowledge and I did not observe it, nor did I hear it happen.

  • Thank you, Mr Witness. How about the specific message that this witness referred to? The witness says that the witness could remember one message about the bombardment of a Guinean helicopter gunship. First, the Guinean gunship bombarded Liberian territory and this witness prepared a message and it was transmitted to 020. And then, after that, Daniel Chea, the defence minister, came on the BBC. And then there was a message directly from Benjamin Yeaten about the bombing of that Guinean helicopter gunship. So the witness said the message was prepared, at the authority of Benjamin Yeaten and the message was transmitted to 020. Are you aware of any messages being received at the Executive Mansion regarding the bombardment of a Guinean gunship?

  • I am not aware of any radio communication like that. And, furthermore, this particular witness, like I said, he never served as a radio operator to Benjamin Yeaten.

  • Thank you, Mr Witness. May we have please produced Prosecution exhibit P-98. I do have clean colour copies here of the same exhibit. Yes, he may change seats, please.

    Madam Court Officer, if we could first just scroll to the top so everybody sees the caption of this map. It reads, "Main radio bases while TF1-516 was at Planet 1 (Buedu) and Base 1 (Liberia), as indicated by TF1-516".

    Mr Witness, do you follow what I've just read?

  • Yes.

  • And, on the basis of the transcripts from this witness's evidence, in particular page 7017 - it really starts at 7015 through 7018, but between pages 7017 and 7018 of the transcript of 9 April 2008, the period of time that this witness says this map reflects and the information on this map reflects is the period from 1998 until 2001, the witness said, while testifying, that they were in Buedu at Planet 1 in 1998, that in June or July of 1999, they moved to Liberia and they were at Base 1 until 2001. That is, they were in Liberia until 2001.

    Mr Witness, take a look at that. Let's start first with the city of Monrovia down below. Do you see Monrovia there, Mr Witness?

  • Yes, yes. I have seen Monrovia.

  • Now, the witness lists as the main radio stations in Monrovia between this period, 1998 and 2001, as being Base 1, Yeaten's house, and 020, Executive Mansion.

    Now, what were the main radio stations for the Government of Liberia in Monrovia in that period of time? This is 1998 until 2001.

  • Okay. At the Executive Mansion there were two radios, Proton, which is the radio within the Executive Mansion building that was controlled by the Special Security Service, and then within the fence of the Executive Mansion was the ATU radio at the ATU head office, the code for which I do not recall now because I have forgotten it. And then outside of the Executive Mansion, there was a radio at the Justice Ministry also. The Justice Ministry had a radio, that is in Monrovia. And the national police headquarters had a radio - had radios, both long-range and short-range. The Defence Ministry, that is the Ministry of National Defence, also had radio. It also had radio. The NSA, the National Security Agency, had a radio that was in Monrovia. The Bureau of Immigration and Naturalisation, the BIN, also had radio at their head office in Monrovia. There was radio at Joseph Montgomery's house. There was radio at Monie Captan's house, and we considered Monie Captan's radio to fall under the Foreign Ministry, although it was at his residence. Also, President Blah had radio in his house and another mobile one, and the call sign for that was Scorpion, that is Vice-President Moses Blah. These are some amongst others that I might remember later.

  • Thank you, Mr Witness. How about in Gbarnga, Bong County? We see an "X" in Gbarnga. During that period of time, 1998 until 2001, what was - well, let me ask you: How many radios did the Government of Liberia have in Gbarnga?

  • The government had just one radio in Gbarnga, and it was the SSS radio which was call sign 38.

  • Thank you, Mr Witness. Let's look at where you see the other stars. We are now going into Lofa County. Let's start with Zorzor. Was there a radio owned by the Government of Liberia in Zorzor between 1998 and 2001?

  • There was no radio in Zorzor. There was no radio in Zorzor.

  • The next star we see in Lofa County is Tenenbu, T-E-N-E-N-B-U, Tenenbu. Was there a radio located in Tenenbu owned by the Government of Liberia between 1998 and 2001?

  • There was no radio based in Tenenbu.

  • How about Voinjama?

  • Yes. The police had a radio in Voinjama.

  • Have you told us its call sign before?

  • And what is that call sign?

  • The call sign is Forest, Forest.

  • Is this the radio that was used by Tomah, or the person you referred to as Tomah?

  • How about in Kolahun?

  • There was no radio in Kolahun as well.

  • Foya had a radio later on. Foya had a radio. But when we are talking about '98 to 2001, Foya had a radio.

  • You just said "later on". What did you mean by "later on"?

  • I said "later on" because Foya had the navy radio during the LURD incursion. That was when Foya had the navy radio by the call sign Amphibian Base, which was sometimes called Foxtrot Yankee.

  • Is it the case that before LURD invaded Liberia, there was no such radio in Foya?

  • There was no radio in Foya, to my knowledge.

  • Thank you, Mr Witness.

  • Okay. Now, can I explain about Tenenbu, Zorzor and what have you?

  • I want to throw a little bit of light there. Okay. Now, during the LURD incursion, this radio at Voinjama, Forest, Forest became, I would say, a displaced radio. It could be transferred, based on the situation. If there was an attack, if there was an attack on Voinjama, this radio would be transferred sometimes to Tenenbu and Tenenbu is a village around Voinjama area. Okay. It will be transferred to Tenenbu if Tenenbu was safe. And sometimes this radio will be transferred to Zorzor, depending on the intensity of the war. So it was like here and there, here and there, during the course of the war.

  • Very well. But before LURD invaded Liberia, was that radio based in Voinjama?

  • Yes. Before LURD invasion, Forest was based in Voinjama city.

  • Thank you, Mr Witness. That's all I have with the exhibit.

  • So just for clarification, he says the radio in Voinjama could be transferred to Zorzor and Tenenbu during the LURD invasion, but he had also said earlier that Tenenbu had a radio station. Is this the same radio station, or this was a different radio station from the one transferred from Voinjama?

  • If I said that, then it was the slip of tongue. I said Tenenbu was a village around Zorzor, but based on the war, if Tenenbu was safe whilst Voinjama is under attack, if they had to retreat with the radio towards Tenenbu, then the radio would be based in Tenenbu on a temporary basis due to the condition of the war. But Tenenbu never had a base radio. This is a very small village and it never had a base radio.

  • Yes, Madam President, on my LiveNote it is accurate that the witness said previously, this is at page 128, between lines 6 and 9, that there was no radio based in Tenenbu, but the question is nonetheless a valid one, given the subsequent explanation given by the witness about the radio in Voinjama.

    Mr Witness, that's all I have for that exhibit.

    I don't know if your Honours have any questions but that's all I have.

  • The witness also said the National Security Agency had a radio. Do you know the code name for that radio?

  • I don't know. I can't - I do not remember the code name for this radio because those radios in the city of Monrovia, we were not actually dealing with them constantly. We were mainly focused around those troublesome areas, more especially in Lofa County. But those radios in the city of Monrovia, we normally did not communicate with them. So I do not remember the call signs as of now.

  • What about the Bureau of Immigration and Naturalisation? Do you remember the radio code name for that?

  • The Bureau of Immigration and Naturalisation had a code name, but as I said, it is one of those radios that was in the city and we did not normally interact with them, even though their code was on the chart with us, but once you were not interacting with them, you did not remember their code after a long period of time.

  • Thank you, Mr Witness.

    The exhibit may be put away and the witness may resume his regular position.

    Madam Court Manager, can we go to page 7033 of the transcript of 9 April 2008, starting at line number 17. The question was posed to the same witness, TF1-516:

    "Q. Mr Witness, you mentioned Eagle. What more do you

    know about Colonel Eagle?

    A. Colonel Eagle was instructed, or was ordered by General

    Issa Sesay, to cross into Liberia to help fight the LURD

    forces in Voinjama.

    Q. So Colonel Eagle was in which group?

    A. He was an RUF officer.

    Q. What nationality was he?

    A. A Sierra Leonean.

    Q. Did he have another name apart from Eagle?

    A. Something Karmoh."

    Then the witness goes on to spell Karmoh. Over to the next page:

    "Q. You also mention Chucky" - this was a question to the witness - "who was he?

    A. An RUF officer.

    Q. What nationality was he?

    A. Sierra Leonean.

    Q. Did he have another name?

    A. That is the only name I knew him by.

    Q. You have given us this occasion when you were taken

    there by 50, that's Benjamin Yeaten, do you recall going

    there on another occasion at all or before this occasion?

    A. I cannot recall.

    Q. In your earlier testimony you said that you, when you

    travelled to Liberia, when you eventually moved to

    Monrovia, you distributed the code chart which you had

    brought with you to the operators, one in 020, that is at

    the mansion, and the other at Base 1.

    A. Yes, sir.

    Q. When did you go to hand this chart to the operator at

    the Executive Mansion?

    A. I met with Sky 1. Sky 1 met me at Base 1, so he was

    given one for his station, 020.

    Q. Sky 1 meaning the operator for 020?

    A. 020.

    Q. Where did he meet you?

    A. At Sunlight's station.

    Q. Where is that?

    A. Base 1. I gave him the code chart."

    Mr Witness, we have talked about this, but let's just go over to the next page, 7035:

    "Q. And that is where? Where? Location? What location?

    A. Sky 17 operated the radio of 020. I gave him the code

    chart right at Base 1. I arrived at Base 1, contacted him

    and he met me and he was given the code chart.

    Q. When I asked you is - where is Base 1, I am asking you

    where is the location? You have testified before about

    where Base 1 is, but I would ask that every time I ask you

    where it is it's for clarity, so you give us the location,

    please. So where at this point when you say you gave the

    code chart to Sunlight, where did you give it to him?

    A. Sunlight to Base 1."

    And the witness says Base 1 is in Congo Town. Mr Witness, was there every this meeting where this witness, TF1-516, came over to Base 1? The witness made contact, he said he contacted Sky 1 and he gave Sky 1 the code chart at Base 1. Was there ever such an occurrence when Sky 1 came to Base 1, this witness, TF1-516, was there and there was this hand over of the code charts?

  • Sky 1 never visited Base 1. Since Base 1 was installed, up to 2003, Sky 1 never visited Base 1. This witness too never operated in the scope of Base 1. He never visited Base 1 with a chart and it did not happen this way.

  • Let's go over to page 7036, at the top of the page. There is a question posed:

    "Q. Do you know - did he tell you anything more about

    which part of the building the President worked?

    A. I think he said at the sixth floor.

    Q. And by the President you --

    A. He said the top most floor.

    Q. And by the President you are referring to who?

    A. President Charles Taylor.

    Q. On this occasion that you went to the mansion, you

    mentioned something about 50 introducing Eagle to

    Charles Taylor, is that correct?

    A. Yes, sir.

    Q. Can you describe the situation again in which this

    introduction occurred?

    A. In front of the mansion. In fact, there we met Sierra

    Leoneans and those were men who were taken to Liberia by

    Sam Bockarie. We had known them before.

    Q. Right.

    A. Okay. And they were in a muster parade and the

    President came, trying to go up the mansion, he came down

    and then 50 saluted and he stated, he said, 'Those are the

    men who helped us to capture Voinjama' but he did not talk

    to us anyway. Then he moved down and he shook hands with

    50, he went up and we stood there right in front talking to

    those other ATU guys who were all Sierra Leoneans.

    Q. Was that the first time that you saw the President

    Charles Taylor in Liberia?

    A. I had seen him before in Gbarnga, I had seen him in

    Gbarnga before Monrovia.

    Q. On what occasion was this? When did you see him in

    Gbarnga?"

    Let's pause there. Mr Witness, TF1-516 says someone told him that the President's - that the President worked - first he said he thought it was the sixth floor and then he said the top most floor of the Executive Mansion. Where again was the President's office in the Executive Mansion, what floor?

  • The office of the President in the Executive Mansion is on the fourth floor of the Executive Mansion.

  • You heard reference to a muster parade involving Sierra Leoneans, those ATU guys, these were some of the men who were taken to Liberia by Sam Bockarie. This was held at the Executive Mansion.

    Now, granted that you may not have been present, did you ever hear of such a parade being held at the Executive Mansion?

  • I never heard of such a parade.

  • Do you know somebody called Colonel Eagle with the first name Karmoh?

  • No, I do not know such a person, but I - excuse me, please, I mentioned an Eagle yesterday in my testimony. What I said, he was one of the commanders of the government forces that was fighting in Lofa against LURD but I forgot his name. I said he was Flying Eagle, not Eagle. His name is Mark Guahn, he had the code name Flying Eagle for the Government of Liberia and he is a Liberian.

  • Can you spell the last name for Mark for us, please?

  • Mark Guahn. Guahn should be G-U-H-A-N - G-U-A-H-N.

  • Was that Mark or Mike? Can you spell his first name, please.

  • Mark, M-A-R-K. Mark Guahn.

  • Madam Court Manager may we go to 7068, 9 April 2008.

  • Mr Witness, listen to this, line 1:

    "Q. How did you know this?

    A. He said it during the muster parade when he was

    addressing the soldiers to move to the border.

    Q. And where was this parade?

    A. In Foya.

    Q. Okay.

    A. In Foya.

    Q. And did any RUF fighters get involved in this

    operation?

    A. Yes, sir. General Issa came with some armed men. In

    fact, a good number of armed men with some artillery

    pieces.

    Q. Do you know how this came about, General Issa coming

    with armed men? How was this initiated?

    A. At this time establishment was there now in - I mean,

    in Sierra Leone and Liberia. They were communicating

    through the satellite phone.

    Q. When you say 'they were', who were?

    A. 50 and General Issa were communicating over the

    satellite phone.

    Q. How do you know this?

    A. At some point in time I was given both the radio and

    the satellite phone to maintain communication with General

    Issa.

    Q. Who gave you this?

    A. General 50.

    Q. And were you supposed to be talking to General Issa on

    the satellite phone as well?

    A. I was not communicating. I was taking care of the

    satellite phone. When there was a call I had to rush to

    have 50 informed."

    We are now at page 7069:

    "In fact, at this time in Foya we had the front line - I

    mean the PC Ground. And the PC Ground was Surumba. He

    never used to take this equipment to the front line. He

    left them in Foya. When there was a call on the telephone

    and we had to call him to come and address to that call, he

    was receiving call from Monrovia. In fact, it was Sunlight

    who was making a follow-up. He said, 'We are calling you

    on the telephone. There is no response'. I responded by

    saying that 50 had proceeded to the front line.

    Q. Now, when you said the PC Ground, what do you mean?

    A. That was the preparatory ground.

    Q. Preparatory?

    A. Well, we had from the PC Ground to the combat camp and

    to the target."

    Then a question is posed by Justice Sebutinde:

    "The location of the PC Ground, what was it called?"

    The witness says:

    "Foya was the PC Ground and Surumba I spoke about was the

    combat camp and Gueckedou was the target because it was the

    focal point to attack."

    Let's pause there. Mr Witness --

  • Yes.

  • This witness speaks of Issa Sesay, he refers to him as General Issa, coming with a good number of armed men with some artillery pieces. You heard reference to Gueckedou being the target, the focal point to attack. Then the witness spoke of communicating - communication through the satellite phone between Benjamin Yeaten and Issa Sesay. Then the witness says that, in fact, Benjamin Yeaten did not take his satellite phone to the front line and, in one instance, a call was received from Monrovia from Sunlight who said, "We're calling you on the telephone, there is no response". This is to Benjamin Yeaten. Let's take them in pieces, in stages.

    When you were in Base 1 were you ever aware of an operation in the vicinity of Gueckedou, in Guinea, being undertaken by Benjamin Yeaten with the assistance of Issa Sesay and armed men with artillery pieces that were brought by Issa Sesay?

  • I don't know of Benjamin Yeaten being - I don't know of Benjamin Yeaten participating in any military activity in Gueckedou or Guinea.

  • How about in Liberia, while you were in Base 1 are you aware of Benjamin Yeaten receiving support of manpower, that is, armed men or women, to fight alongside Benjamin Yeaten in Liberia?

  • I am not aware of Benjamin Yeaten receiving armed men or manpower from the RUF to fight along with him in Liberia. But I am aware, as I said yesterday, of a group of Liberians who were with the RUF from the beginning of the RUF who were all Liberian nationals. They came and told Benjamin Yeaten that they did not want to stay in Sierra Leone during the disarmament process. So they run away to come, in order to help their motherland, Liberia. And they told Benjamin Yeaten that nobody sent them, they were not sent by anyone, they hid and came and they came along with their bodyguards and their bodyguards were all armed. This is what I know about it. But Benjamin Yeaten did not send or request manpower from the RUF or from anyone outside of Liberia to fight in Liberia or to assist in the Liberian war, to my knowledge.

  • Thank you. How about this communication from Sunlight asking that they had been trying to reach Benjamin Yeaten's telephone but there was no response? Do you remember Sunlight making such a radio call to TF1-516 who responded from Benjamin Yeaten's end?

  • I would answer by saying that Sunlight never dealt with TF1-516 at any point with Benjamin Yeaten. He was not assigned to Benjamin Yeaten, as far as I am concerned.

  • Thank you, Mr Witness. Continuing with line 17 at that page - well, let's go to line 28 which reads:

    "How exactly did you - how exactly did - you said Issa

    Sesay provided manpower. Is that right?"

    And we go over to the next page, 7070:

    "A. He was - in fact he was there himself in Foya. He came

    to Foya during this time, his operation was about to set

    in. He was there. He came to Foya.

    Q. Issa Sesay himself?

    A. Yes, sir.

    Q. Why did he come to Foya?

    A. I was just a messenger, in fact a slave for that

    matter, and a slave does whatever his master tells him.

    Q. And what were you told to do?

    A. To transmit messages. When I was given message by

    Yeaten I had no alternative but to transmit it. When

    message came for Yeaten I had no alternative but to receive

    it and pass it on to him.

    Q. And in this case what message were you given to

    transmit to Issa Sesay to get him to come to Foya?

    A. They are had established communication over the

    telephone. They were communicating on the telephone.

    Q. Right.

    A. The messages I had for Issa was to tell him to put on

    the 2-1.

    Q. Now following the communication which Issa had with

    Yeaten, what happened? After that communication, what

    happened?

    A. Issa himself came to Foya, Liberia.

    Q. Did he come alone?

    A. He came with armed men, a good number of armed men, and

    together with Benjamin D Yeaten and some other fighters

    they set in for Surumba."

    Let's pause there. Are you aware of this, Mr Witness: Of Issa Sesay coming to Foya with armed men, joining Benjamin Yeaten and the group setting off for Surumba? Are you aware of any of this happening?

  • No, it's not to my knowledge.

  • Were there any radio messages transmitted from the front line by Benjamin Yeaten's mobile radio, Mobile 1, that alerted Base 1 to such an occurrence: that RUF were engaged in a joint operation with Surumba in mind as a possible target while you were at Base 1?

  • Thank you. Can we go over to page 7110, starting at line 17. That's 7110. Mr Witness, listen to this. What I will be reading you is a message that was read to TF1-516, where at line 16 the witness is asked:

    "Q. Could you read for us, Mr Witness then?"

    And the witness reads:

    "A. 'Reference to the telephone conversation yesterday I

    have dispatched 10 boxes of AK rounds and 10 boxes of RPG

    rockets (all with TNTs )for smooth operation. Colonel

    Gbovay is en route, together with one of your men (Major

    Takpor) assigned at Foya airfield. Contact and keep me

    posted any latest development'.

    Q. Now this message, can you tell us exactly what the

    context was in which this message was sent?"

    Answer by TF1-516:

    "A. This message was to be relayed to - it was received

    from Base 1 and it was to be relayed to General 50's radio

    station at that time in Buedu, okay? I received this

    message in code somewhere around in this same book. The

    message really was not for me because at that time I was

    not assigned to General Issa's station, okay? I

    transmitted same message - when we talk about relay, let us

    take for example one station is not on set - I mean is not

    on the air. You are on the air and you can receive the

    message and later on transmit the same message. That was

    what happened. This message was received and it was later

    on relayed. But since I had an interest, I was an operator

    and received the message, I transcribed it to know the

    content of this message."

    I'll stop there. Now, Mr Witness, you heard the message I read. It said:

    "Reference to the telephone conversation yesterday I have dispatched 10 boxes of AK rounds, 10 boxes of RPG boxes (all with TNTs) for smooth operation."

    There is a name mentioned, Colonel Gbovay, who was said to be en route, together with one of your men, Major Takpor, who was assign to Foya airfield. Are you aware of Base 1 ever sending this sort of message that was made available to TF1-516 or that TF1-516 was privy to?

  • That is not to my knowledge.

  • Do you know a Colonel Gbovay, G-B-O-V-A-Y?

  • I don't know Gbovay.

  • Was there a Major Takpor, T-A-K-P-O-R, assigned to Foya airfield, to your knowledge?

  • Thank you, Mr Witness.

  • Do you mean, Mr Witness, that you don't know, or that he was not assigned?

  • I don't know a Major Takpor and I do not know Gbovay.

  • Did you ever hear about either of them, Takpor or Gbovay?

  • I never heard about them.

  • Thank you. May we go to page 7112, starting at line 22:

    "Q. Mr Witness, having read that message, do you recall the

    context in which the supply of those materials was made?

    A. Yes, sir.

    Q. What was the context? In what situation?

    A. The message was transmitted by Base 1, that was

    Sunlight, and it was to be relayed to General Issa's

    station. That was the time we were in Buedu and the

    forces, Amphibian Father and others, fought hard to retake

    Foya, so they were still in Foya together with the RUF

    fighters who were there. And there was a mission at hand

    that was organised by 50, collect - jointly with Issa, that

    they were to move into Guinea and keep some of the weapons,

    that not all of the weapons were to be submitted to the UN,

    and that they were to have their security set up somewhere.

    They were to again enter Guinea. So this message was

    received in code, transcribed and it remained in this book,

    and not until the time Sahr James met me and had to take it

    from the code, the transcribed one was now re-coded in here

    and handed over to Sahr James who was once the station

    sergeant. He met me and asked for a document, if I had

    any, and then he carried these books.

    Q. And according to this message, who was supplying

    weapons to who?

    A. 50 sent a message that - there was a message for 50 to

    send materials to General Issa's men in Foya to carry out

    certain missions.

    Q. And so this was a response to that message?

    A. Yes, sir."

    Now, Mr Witness, are you following any of this? The witness said that there was supposed to be a joint operation with 50 and Issa and this message, or this operation, was pertaining to their entry into Guinea. In that respect there was a message that was sent requesting materials to be sent to Issa's men in Foya and that Sunlight responded to that message. Do you follow what I'm saying? Do you recall any of this happening? First, a joint operation into Guinea by Issa's men and Benjamin Yeaten?

  • I don't have knowledge of such and, secondly, Sunlight whilst at Base 1 never received a message from Benjamin Yeaten or from anyone to Issa or for Issa to be either transmitted directly or indirectly to him. Sunlight never received any information for Issa from the start to the end of Base 1.

  • So where it says there was a message for 50 to send materials to General Issa's men in Foya to carry out certain missions, are you saying that never was received at Base 1?

  • That was never received at Base 1. Not at all.

  • To your knowledge, did Sunlight ever respond to such a message, because here this witness says that message was responded to, the message requesting supplies or materials to be sent to Issa. Was there a response from Base 1 to that message?

  • Sunlight never responded to such a message. Sunlight never responded to a message in connection to Issa or in connection to the transfer of material, either to the RUF or to Issa.

  • May we go, please, to the next day's transcript, 10 April 2008, page 7185, starting at line 1. Mr Witness, listen to this. There was a question posed:

    "Q. Now, the name Ebony, what was it? This same person

    called Samuel Lamboi was called Ebony. Ebony was what?

    What kind of name was that?

    A. It was just a nickname.

    Q. Do you now how he got that name?

    A. Before I joined the signal unit, Ebony was already on

    the radio operating, that is across the Moa River."

    Mr Witness, you remember telling us about the code name Ebony that you heard?

  • Yes.

  • How about this name Samuel Lamboi? Did you ever hear this name while you were at Base 1?

  • And then, starting at line 11, there is the question:

    "Q. Do you recall the name Senegalese?

    A. Yes, sir.

    Q. Who was that person?

    A. Senegalese at one time was a member of the RUF. That

    was the time ECOMOG intervention took place. I think he

    met me in Sengema and he was to travel to Kono. He was

    once a member of the ULIMO fighters. According to report

    we gathered when RUF joined their forces with AFRC was that

    that Senegalese was one of the soldiers who were fighting

    alongside the government forces, the SLAs. So when ECOMOG

    intervention took place, he also retreated to Buedu. So he

    was commanded by Sam Bockarie to move to Kono on

    assignment."

    Now, did you ever hear of someone by the name Senegalese while you were at Base 1?

  • I heard of Senegalese. And there were a lot of people in Liberia who were referred to as Senegalese as a nickname. That is like Mosquito, like I explained. Those who were tall and slim bodily could be referred to as Senegalese because, in Liberia, they say the Senegalese are tall people. So a lot of people were called Senegalese. Even one of my friends was called Senegalese because he was tall and slim. But I don't know the Senegalese he is talking about. But the Senegalese that I knew was a Liberian Senegalese.

  • Thank you, Mr Witness. Let's just go over to the next page because I see something that should be on the record as well. This is at page 7186. The witness, TF1-516, sought to make a clarification and the Presiding Judge allowed it, and the witness was asked the question:

    "Q. Yes, what is it you wish to clarify?"

    And the witness went on to say at line 7:

    "A. I was asked a question to state the number of times I

    went to the mansion and I spoke of handing over a code

    chart to operator Sky 1. Operator Sky 1 was not assigned

    at Base 1. He was at 020 and it was at 020 that I gave him

    the code chart. I gave the code chart to Sunlight at

    Base 1, and if that is the case, then the number of times I

    went to the Executive Mansion Ground is supposed to be two,

    but not one."

    Now, Mr Witness, we have had three different versions of this from the same witness's testimony. First it was that the code was given at the Executive Mansion, and then it was that it was given at Base 1, this is the code to Sky 1, and here at page 7186, as opposed to what appears on page 7034, the witness says operator Sky 1 was not assigned at Base 1, and it was at 020 that the witness gave Sky 1 the chart.

    So let me just ask you one last question about that: Did you ever know of that person you know as TF1-516 going to the Executive Mansion and handing over a code chart to Sky 1?

  • I don't know - I don't know at all whether this witness ever went to the Executive Mansion on whatsoever occasion. I don't know. So --

  • That's fair enough.

    Madam Court Manager, may we go to the next day's transcript, 11 April 2008, starting at page 7316, please. We will start at line 14. There is a question posed to TF1-516:

    "Q. Yesterday in court you said several times that

    operator Life transmitted that message. True?

    A. Life transmitted the message to me. I received the

    message from operator Life. It was Life who was on set

    from Benjamin Yeaten's station at that time."

    Let's stop there. Mr Witness, you mentioned an operator called Life to us. Where was that operator assigned?

  • Life was assigned at call sign Forest, which was the police radio in Voinjama that I had spoken about.

  • Did Life ever, to your knowledge, transmit a message from Benjamin Yeaten's station to TF1-516?

  • To the best of my knowledge, Life never transmitted any message from Base 1 to any area of radio communication. Life never used the radio at Base 1 at any point in time.

  • How about Benjamin Yeaten's mobile radio, Mobile 1? To your knowledge, did Life ever serve as the radio operator for Mobile 1?

  • Life never served as an operator for Mobile 1.

  • Shall we go to page 7317, the next page, starting at line 26? There is a question posed:

    "Q. Mr Witness, you told us on Wednesday it was Sunlight

    who transmitted this message, right?

    A. Let me explain.

    Q. Yes or no? I just read your transcript. Do you agree

    that you said on Wednesday it was Sunlight who transmitted

    that message?

    A. Base 1, operator Life. Base 1 was the name of the call

    sign, Base 1."

    And then we go to line 7:

    "Q. I'm trying to ascertain the name of the radio operator

    who transmitted the message. You said yesterday it was

    Life. On Wednesday you said it was Sunlight. Do you

    agree?

    A. Before this time, I had stated Life. It is on the

    document, and I stated in one - in my testimony about Life,

    from call sign Base 1.

    Q. Are you saying you made a mistake on Wednesday?

    A. If I had mentioned Sunlight, which you said is on the

    screen, then that was a mistake, but long before I had

    stated operator Life and Base 1 was the name of the radio

    station and I was asked, 'From where did you get this

    information?' I said Base 1. That was the radio set, the

    name of the radio, the call sign from where this message

    was received. The name of the operator that transmitted

    the message was operator Life."

    Mr Witness, did you follow what I've read?

  • Yes, yes.

  • This witness is saying that a message was transmitted that this witness received, from operator Life, using Base 1. Now, did that ever happen? Was there any occasion when operator Life transmitted a message from Base 1?

  • There was no time that operator Life transmitted any message from Base 1 to any other location, and that Life was not assigned at Base 1. Life was a police radio operator assigned in Lofa County. He was not assigned at Base 1.