The transcripts of the trial of Charles Taylor, former President of Liberia. More…

  • Good morning, Mr Witness.

  • Good morning, my Lord.

  • Mr Interpreter, I think the witness is not getting an interpretation. Is that correct, Mr Witness?

  • Mr Interpreter, are you hearing me?

  • The interpreters are in the booth. Let me just check.

  • Thank you very much. Please pause while the interpreters are checking. Mr Interpreter, we are just checking if the witness is on the right channel. Are the interpreters in position?

  • The interpreters are in the booth, your Honour.

  • Thank you. I am informed that the interpreters are in the booth. Mr Interpreter, would you say something now to the witness so that we can make sure he is hearing you clearly.

  • Yes, Miss.

  • Ms Alagendra, please proceed.

  • Thank you, your Honour:

  • Good morning, Mr Witness.

  • Good morning, my Lord.

  • Are you feeling better this morning?

  • I say thanks to God. It is better.

  • Your Honours, before I proceed with examining the witness, I have gone through the transcripts of the proceedings of yesterday and I just wanted to put on record that the spelling of Foroh Loko is not correct on the transcript. It should be F-O-R-O-H and the transcript has stopped with F-O-R-O.

  • I think I did hear it spelt that way, so in fairness to the transcribers --

  • It could have been my fault.

  • That will be noted and picked up in due course. Please proceed.

  • Mr Witness, before we continue from where you stopped yesterday evening, there are a few matters which I wanted to clarify with you which arose from your testimony yesterday. Mr Witness, you were testifying about an attack which took place in Karina yesterday. Can you tell us for how long were the troops that you were with in Karina for this attack?

  • Well, we spent about - because we came there around 5, we were there up to 7, to 8, before we left Karina. It was about four hours, or so.

  • Which time of day was this 5?

  • And you were there until 7 or 8, which time of day?

  • Yes, 7 or 8 a.m., my Lord.

  • Witness, I asked you a question yesterday as to who was taking the lead as your troops were entering Karina and you gave us an answer which does not seem to be so clear on the record. I am just going to read your answer back to you. Your answer was, "D company took the lead" --

  • Madam President, I would be grateful to have the page number of the transcript.

  • Yes, certainly. I apologise. I am looking at page 41 of the draft transcript from lines 10 to 15.

  • I have the final version.

  • Your Honours, if I can go ahead with the question and ask a colleague to help me with getting the page out:

  • Mr Witness, your answer was:

    "D company took the lead and Tito too was leading, so the brigade stopped by and it was at the rear, but they took some men from B and C company to take the lead because we had information that there was a military strategic point there."

    Witness, just to be clear can you explain, when your troops were entering Karina who took the lead?

  • Well, like I said, because of this information that we received that a military point was ahead, the brigade was at the rear for some time because they were with their family members. D company, A company and I said Tito and some battalion --

  • Your Honours, the witness is going too fast for the interpreter.

  • Mr Witness, the interpreter is trying to keep up with you. If you could speak a little slower to allow him to interpret.

  • Perhaps you said, "D company, A company and I said Tito and some battalions". Please pick up from there.

  • Like I said, D company, A company and some men that were chosen from the other companies to take the advance to Karina and indeed we did move, myself, together with Bazzy, and attacked Karina, but since there were no enemy positions in Karina the brigade at the rear came and joined us in Karina.

  • Your Honours, this is at line 18 to 24 at page 8090 of the transcript:

  • Witness, yesterday you were testifying about the women who were with the troops in Camp Rosos and you explained that there was a procedure whereby disciplinary action was taken against women and you explained an incident about a woman who was put into a box. Do you recall that?

  • Yes, my Lord.

  • Witness, during the time that the troops were based in Camp Rosos, do you recall how frequently this happened?

  • Well, this was something that was happening in the other battalions. They too had this disciplinary action like I have said. It was something that used to happen. It happened. Most times it did happen at Camp Rosos.

  • Mr Witness, I understand counsel is asking you can you remember how often it happened?

  • Well, it happened not too often, but it did happen.

  • Witness, you also testified that this thing --

  • Just in reference to the last series of questions about Karina, the reference I got from counsel, I visited the page and I have a different page number for the questions as to who was leading and not leading the convoy and I am wondering if we were discussing the same set of questions. Counsel indicated the page number being 8090 and in the transcript I am looking at the series of questions appear on 8071 and it was there posed to the witness, "Who was leading the convey amongst the various companies?"

  • Your Honours, if I can just correct that.

  • Is that to Karina in particular?

  • Yes, Justice Sebutinde. I will read the excerpt that I have.

  • Your Honours, I think I may have made a mistake if I can just correct that, the page number.

  • Yes, your Honour. It should be 8092 from line 2.

  • The interest is to ensure that the proper transcript was put to the witness, that is regardless of what page number.

  • Your Honours, in that respect what I read out to the witness is what I am referring to. I do apologise for that, your Honour.

  • Have you been able to find it, Mr Anyah?

  • Yes, indeed I have, but the subject matter is discussed earlier in the transcript and I was focused on the initial series of questioning about the same subject matter. So it appears twice in the transcript.

  • You have heard counsel say that it - the question that was put is as in the transcript and I want to ensure fairness and propriety and there doesn't appear to be an objection.

  • No, there does not. Thank you, Madam President.

  • Witness, you testified yesterday that the same thing happened in relation to women where disciplinary action was taken and they were put into boxes in this regard in Colonel Eddie Town. Do you recall that?

  • Yes, my Lord.

  • In respect of Colonel Eddie Town, can you tell the Court how often this happened?

  • Well, it used to happen. It was not too often, but it used to happen. Complaints used to come and then disciplinary action taken. Five-Five would refer them to the mammy queen and for the most times they will be placed in a box.

  • Witness, at Colonel Eddie Town do you recall what rank Foday Bah Marah was?

  • Well, Foday Bah Marah was also promoted to the rank of major, but when O-Five arrived Gullit also promoted O-Five and the others to lieutenant colonel.

  • Can you give us a time frame, witness?

  • Well, it was within a short period of time after the arrival of O-Five. We were also promoted as well, myself and some others were promoted as second lieutenant.

  • Witness, yesterday when you were testifying about communications between Gullit and SAJ Musa and Superman wherein you told the Court that Gullit was being informed that reinforcements are being dispatched to him in the form of O-Five, do you recall that?

  • Yes, my Lord.

  • How do you know about this communication?

  • Well, like I have said, before the communication came the runner will have a leaflet, whatever information he had that I want to talk to so and so commander, the runner would take the information to the commander, Gullit will send for Hassan Papa Bangura and some others to come and listen. So within this time when this runner went to Hassan Papa Bangura, myself and some others who were with him went and met Gullit and then we went to the set.

  • Witness, when you say "and some others who were with him went and met Gullit", some others who were with who?

  • I am talking about Hassan Papa Bangura. Since he was the operation commander he had some other soldiers who were assigned to him, so whenever he receives a call myself and some other men would join him to go, some men who had stayed with him at the house.

  • Witness, yesterday you told the Court that SBUs were trained in Camp Rosos and you were asked what happened to these SBUs after the training. A part of your answer to the Court was that the SBUs were used to amputate the people. Can you tell the Court in which places did these SBUs amputate people?

  • Well, for example, when Gullit gave the order, for instance when we go on food finding patrol, like in the Rokulan area, it happened also in Royanka when we went on food finding patrol in that area some civilians were amputated and it was the SBUs who did it because they were having machetes.

  • Witness, can you spell Royanka?

  • Royanka, R-O-Y-A-N-K-A.

  • And where is Rokulan?

  • It is in the Bombali District within the Sanda area.

  • And Royanka, where is it?

  • In the Bombali District within the Sanda area.

  • Witness, yesterday you were telling the Court about a hand radio that your group had and you told the Court this - your Honours, I am referring to page 8172 from line 29 to page 8173 line 3. The question put to you was: "You said you were very busy with the radio and you were not talking about a communication radio, but you were talking about a hand radio" and a part of your answer was, "For instance, when we attacked" --

  • Just pause, Ms Alagendra. Mr Anyah, you are on your feet.

  • I thought we might perhaps have a different transcript, but are you --

  • Which edition are we reading from so we can all be on the same.

  • I believe it is the final version I have, your Honour.

  • Was there only one final version?

  • And you said lines 26?

  • No, I have 29 in my notebook.

  • A sentence that starts, "For instance"?

  • Okay, I'm there. Thank you.

  • If there is any doubt maybe the full sentence should be read.

  • Witness, your part of your answer was:

    "For instance when we attacked, when they say it is all over, we are happy so that every commander or junior commander had that. When we went looting we would look for that so we had these radios when we heard this announcement."

    Can you explain that answer, witness?

  • Yes, my Lord.

  • Well, what I was trying to say, those radios - those handsets that we used to tune to BBC, RFI, VOA and even our local radio stations, whenever we go on patrols we would be in possession of those radios, because it is true those radios - for instance, if we attack a particular area, when it is announced, we get it from that radio. That makes us happy that we have attacked and they have said something about it.

  • "They have said something about it." What do you mean by that?

  • I'm saying when we attack, for instance the Gbomsamba attack, when they spoke about the Kamalo attack, the Karina attack, we got that from the handset radio set we had. We listened to that and most times we are almost - we are almost always listening to the BBC, RFI radio. It is true that we get information.

  • Thank you, witness. Witness, I am going to continue from where we stopped yesterday.

  • Just for purposes of record, what is RFI?

  • Witness, can you clarify what do you mean by RFI?

  • This was the Radio France International. It is an international radio station.

  • Witness, we left off yesterday when you were telling the Court about a muster that was called and O-Five was explaining to Gullit and others the information about the people in his group?

  • And you said that during this explanation you were present there with the brigade?

  • Now could you tell us what O-Five said at this muster?

  • Well, during the muster parade O-Five introduced the men he came with, the SLA, the RUF men and also the STF and some Liberian guys - I mean some men that came. He explained that to Gullit - I mean to the rest of the brigade there that the Liberians who were mixed up with the STF, he said Superman came with them from Kailahun who joined them from Liberia. He said they came to reinforce and together they went and captured Mongo and also Kabala and they did prove well, so they have been sent to reinforce us to prepare for the Freetown invasion.

  • Now, witness, when you say "the Liberians who were mixed up with the STF", can you explain what you mean by that?

  • Well, the STF who were there, the Liberians who came, they came and joined us. That is the reason why I said mixed up. The STF were Liberians as well and the others who came and reinforced us at Koinadugu as well.

  • Yesterday when you testified you said that the Liberians who came with O-Five were former NPFL who later became AFL?

  • Well, according to O-Five, he said they were former NPFL fighters and they had gone through the AFL training, the Armed Forces of Liberia, so they came and joined us so that we can push towards Freetown.

  • Now when you say "he said they came to reinforce and together they went and captured Mongo and also Kabala", who are you referring to?

  • I am talking about the Liberians who came, the men that Superman took from Kailahun and they reinforced us as Koinadugu and attacked Mongo Bendugu and Kabala. They were part of the team that O-Five told us he came with to prepare for the Freetown invasion.

  • Do you know how is it that these Liberians came to join O-Five's group?

  • Well, before O-Five came we had received rumours that Liberians had arrived to join us to intervene in Freetown and O-Five did confirm that to us when he came with the troop as he was explaining to the brigade when he told Tamba Alex Brima exactly who those men were that he came with.

  • Now, witness, do you recall how many STF came with O-Five's group?

  • Well, I knew only few, but I cannot recall the number, but the STF were about 30 or so. About 30 STF and the Liberians who came, about 20 of them. Their number was almost 50, that included the Liberians and the STF.

  • Witness, when you say that these Liberians came with Superman and together they attacked Mongo Bendugu and Kabala, can you explain what do you mean by together?

  • I don't believe so.

  • I don't have it in my transcript that the witness said they came with Superman.

  • No, I am talking about where he says the Liberians were mixed up with the STF and he said Superman came with them from Kailahun. I am looking at - for me it is page 12, line 13.

  • Yes, yes, you are right. There is another group. You are right.

  • Yes, I see it and I see where counsel is referring to, but later on in the page - I think it all depends on what we say Superman came with them from Kailahun. I don't know if the witness is saying that Superman brought them from Kailahun and joined O-Five together. I think the witness was saying that these men he has identified as being part of O-Five's group initially came through Superman and that is referred to on page 13, starting at lines 7 through 11, and I am using a 12 point font. The answer was, "I am talking about the Liberians who came, the men that Superman took from Kailahun and they reinforced us" - it is supposed to be "at Koinadugu and they attacked Mongo Bendugu and Kabala. They were part of the team that O-Five told us he came with to prepare for the Freetown invasion." See, I have a different understanding of the record.

  • I think there is a bit of confusion there, Ms Alagendra. It is open to interpretation, so a clarification would be --

  • Thank you, your Honours. I will clarify that:

  • Witness, can you explain, if you know, how these Liberians came to Koinadugu?

  • Well, like I have said, when O-Five was giving the briefing O-Five mentioned that these Liberians that he came with, they were part of the team that came from Kailahun, that Mosquito gave to Superman, who came from Liberia. They came and reinforced SAJ at Koinadugu and all of them went together and attacked Mongo Bendugu and also Kabala.

  • Witness, can you explain what you mean when you say that these Liberians were given by Mosquito to Superman who came from Liberia?

  • Like I have said, according to O-Five he said the Liberian guys he came with were part of the team that came from Liberia to Mosquito. When he went for reinforcement in Kailahun, Mosquito gave them to him, so they came to Koinadugu and reinforced SAJ Musa and they went and attacked Mongo Bendugu and also Kabala. This was part of the team that he came with.

  • That who came with?

  • That O-Five came with at Colonel Eddie Town.

  • Do you know how is it that Superman came into contact with these Liberians?

  • Well, like I have said, according to O-Five we too received a rumour that Superman had gone to Kailahun to get some reinforcement who will come ahead so that we can make a brigade advance to Freetown.

  • Witness, you have said two things. You have said "according to O-Five" and you said you have received a rumour. Could you be a bit clearer as to how is it Superman came into contact with these Liberians?

  • Like I have said, O-Five confirmed it also to us that Superman went to Kailahun for reinforcement and this reinforcement, Mosquito gave him some Liberians, who came from Liberia, to reinforce at Koinadugu so as to attack Mongo Bendugu and Kabala, and to prepare for a brigade advance to Freetown.

  • Witness, just to be clear, you have testified that the STF were Liberians, yes?

  • You referred to 20 Liberian fighters who were NPFL/AFL who you have said came to Koinadugu with Superman.

  • Yes, my Lord.

  • I will object to the leading at this point. This is important information and it should come from the witness.

  • Your Honours, I am putting back to him his previous answer and I want to clarify an issue.

  • I am sorry, I don't recall him testifying or using the phrase "AFL/NPFL" in the same sentence this morning, so we have to be careful the way we are phrasing the questions, putting it to the witness, even if we are recalling prior evidence.

  • There was two references. There was a reference to former NPFL being trained at AFL. I am not reading from my note and I have a separate note that there were 30 or so STF and about 20 Liberians. They were two different issues and you must be careful, Ms Alagendra, not to mix them up. So there is some merit in Mr Anyah's objection.

  • Your Honours, if I can just clarify something. This issue arose yesterday in this witness's testimony wherein he described these Liberian fighters. He did refer to them as NPFL who later became AFL. What I am doing is I am not saying NPFL who later became AFL, but the essence is he did say they were NPFL and later AFL.

  • Yes, but the point is your question says - you referred to 20 Liberian fighters who were NPFL/AFL. Now, that was not part of an answer he gave. The answer he gave was, "There were about 30 STF and about 20 Liberians." STF and NPFL are not necessarily the same, or if they are I have not got sufficient evidence to indicate to me that they are the same.

  • I understand that now, your Honour. I will address this issue:

  • Witness, these Liberian fighters who you said were 20 in number, who were they, do you know?

  • Well, according to O-Five, like I have said, he said they were former NPFL fighters who came and joined the AFL who had come to reinforce. Like I have said earlier, during the communication when SAJ Musa called and spoke with Tamba Alex Brima that there was a reinforcement on the way and that Superman had told us that there was a reinforcement on the way coming who were Liberian fighters.

  • Now, witness, these 20 Liberian fighters who you say were NPFL and later became AFL, you have also referred to STF who you say were 30 in number and who were Liberians, yes?

  • Yes, my Lord.

  • Can you be clear as to whether this group of Liberia fighters, the NPFL/AFL, whether or not they were part of the STF?

  • No, this was a different group. Like I said, the STF was a Special Task Force that was within the army during the reign of the NPRC and also the SLPP tried to integrate them into the army.

  • Your Honours, there was something the witness said which was not complete from the interpretation.

  • Your Honours, can the witness repeat the last bit of his answer?

  • Mr Witness, unfortunately we did not get all your answer. Could you please repeat it starting from the bit where you said, "Like I said, the STF was a Special Task Force that was within the army". Please continue from there.

  • I said the STF was a Special Task Force that included some Liberians whom were within the Sierra Leone Army at the time during the 1992, 1993, 1994, during the reign of the NPRC when Captain Valentine Strasser was the leader. It was part of a group that gave support to fight against the RUF, so they are different from the former fighters I am talking about, the other Liberians that came.

  • Witness, who is different from the former fighters when you say "they are different"?

  • The STF and the other Liberians that came, who were former NPFL fighters, are the ones I am talking about. I said they are different. The two groups are different.

  • Yesterday when you testified about this group that came with O-Five, you said the group was well-armed. Do you recall that?

  • Yes. Yes, my Lord.

  • Can you explain what do you mean by well-armed?

  • Well, they came along with support rifles, HMG, they had RPG, which is --

  • Your Honours, can the witness go back?

  • Just a moment. We didn't get all the weapons there, Mr Witness, I am afraid. You had support rifles, HMG, that doesn't sound right, RPG, what other weapons? We didn't hear the rest.

  • I said they brought along submachine guns. They also had 60 millimetre mortar that they came with and also they had some other rifles like AK, G3, other rifles, LAR. They also had LAR.

  • Mr Interpreter, did you say G3?

  • Yes, your Honour, G3.

  • Witness, you have given us the number of STF fighters, the number of Liberian fighters. Do you recall how many RUF were amongst the group that came with O-Five?

  • The RUFs were there, about 30 of them. It was about a section of them. Sorry, a platoon of them.

  • When you say "a platoon of them", a platoon of who?

  • The RUF, a platoon of RUF.

  • And you told us yesterday the names of some of the people that came with O-Five. You mentioned Med Bajehjeh.

  • Can you tell the Court who he is?

  • Well, Med Bajehjeh was an SLA who came along with the group.

  • Do you recall the names of any of the RUF that came with the group?

  • Yes, there was Captain Stagger. He was with the RUF.

  • You mentioned the name Washington?

  • Yes, Washington, Dukulay, they were STF who came also.

  • Do you recall the names of any of the NPFL/AFL Liberians?

  • Well, I was not too familiar with them. I knew some of them, but some of them were strange to me. Even to some of us in the camp.

  • Now you said that at the time you went to meet with O-Five's group there was an incident and you returned back to Colonel Eddie Town and when you returned you were given a communication set to take with you, do you remember?

  • Yes, my Lord.

  • Did you have a radio operator in your group?

  • Yes, we had a radio operator. I have forgotten his name, but he was with us. When Jalloh died that was the radio operator that replaced him.

  • And you said there was a communication between your group and O-Five's group?

  • Yes, my Lord. We established communication.

  • Do you know who was handling the communication from O-Five's group?

  • As far as I can recall, he had, I think, King Perry. King Perry was one of the communication men he came with. He was one of the communication men that O-Five came with.

  • When you say he was one of the communication men that O-Five came with, were there more?

  • Well, the communication set will have two or three men who will be around it. They will be the runners.

  • Witness, who was King Perry?

  • Well, King Perry was an RUF who also came along with the squad.

  • Did he have any other name?

  • Well, this was the only name I knew him for.

  • Witness, going back to the meeting where O-Five was briefing Gullit and others about his group, did anything else happen during this meeting?

  • Yes, just immediately after the meeting Gullit said we were to establish another battalion wherein they formed the Red Lion battalion and distributed some of the men into the various battalions. So we appointed Med Bajehjeh to be the leader for the Red Lion battalion.

  • Witness, what was the composition of the Red Lion battalion?

  • Well, the Red Lion battalion had - Med Bajehjeh was the SLA that led them, but it had STF and some Liberian former fighters who were NPFL. They were in the Red Lion battalion.

  • And you said some of the men were distributed into various battalions. Which men were distributed to various battalions?

  • Like the SLA and some RUF members were distributed into the different battalions, but the STF --

  • Sorry, your Honour, can the witness repeat the very last bit of his answer?

  • The interpreter didn't get the very last bit of your answer, Mr Witness. Please repeat it. The bit following the words, "Some RUF members were distributed into different battalions, but the STF" and we don't know what happened to them.

  • The STF and the former NPFL fighters who came to reinforce us were based in the Red Lion battalion. They were not separated.

  • And you say some of the RUF were distributed into the different battalions. What happened to the other RUF?

  • Like I have said, they were divided. Some were left at the headquarters, some were sent to the other battalion. That was what happened.

  • Were there any RUF in the Red Lion battalion?

  • Yes, they were part of them and that is the reason why I said they were divided.

  • Did anything else happen in the meeting?

  • Well, as far as I can recall, that was what happened when Gullit divided those people and formed those battalions.

  • After Gullit formed these battalions did anything else happen?

  • Well, yes. Gullit - we had also a small problem at the camp when Gullit called on the operation commander that Gullit had recommended O-Five to be lieutenant colonel so there were - there was grumbling around in the camp, so he said the other commanders too should be promoted. So if he had promoted O-Five that means the other commanders too were to be promoted. So some commanders were promoted and some other commanders at the headquarters too were promoted.

    So Gullit also promoted about 20 of us to second lieutenant, after which he said there should be a test wherein those commanders that had been promoted together with the second lieutenant to prove themselves. So he said we should plan an operation wherein we should go and attack Madina which is in the Tonko Limba Chiefdom in the Kambia District. But later he had a change of mind, because Colonel Eddie said the Madina people went to us, they were good to us, there wasn't a military base there, so they said the Guineans were based in Kukuna, so we should plan an operation to attack Kukuna.

  • Now when you say when Gullit called on the operation commander that Gullit had recommended O-Five to colonel, who is the operation commander you are referring to?

  • The operation commander at the time was Hassan Papa Bangura who was the operation commander. Bomb Blast was the operation commander at Colonel Eddie Town.

  • At this time did O-Five have any assignment?

  • Well, automatically Gullit assigned O-Five as the deputy operation commander. He appointed him as the deputy operation commander for the brigade.

  • Your Honours, for the record, Kukuna is K-U-K-U-N-A.

  • Also I think the witness mentioned that Madina is in the Tonko Limba, not Tonkolili. And the district, I am not sure what district he said.

  • He said Kambia, your Honour:

  • Am I right, witness?

  • Tonko Limba Chiefdom in the Kambia District.

  • Witness, what happened after Gullit said an operation should be planned to attack Kukuna?

  • Well, after this various battalion commanders were summoned and men were chosen to undertake this operation and this operation Bazzy also moved. He was the commander that led the group. We had Five-Five. There was Commander Bomb Blast, O-Five was there and the Red Lion battalion. They were all part of the attack on Kukuna.

  • Did you go on the attack on Kukuna?

  • Yes, my Lord, because Gullit did say it was a test for the officers that he had promoted. So I also took part on the operation on Kukuna.

  • Witness, do you recall what happened during this operation?

  • Well, yes. This operation in Kukuna, we went there and attacked Kukuna and there was a stiff resistance from the Guinean, but they were pushed and set Kukuna on fire. We captured one Guinean officer who was a lieutenant and also a radio man and we did some killing in Kukuna and later we retreated from Kukuna, we looted, we got rice and some other things from Kukuna.

  • Who were the Guineans you are referring to that were in Kukuna?

  • Well, those Guineans were a troop that based in Kukuna. They said they were defending Kukuna because it is part of Sierra Leone, it is bordering Guinea, because of the attack from the AFRC/RUF troop. So they based there working with the government. They were part of the ECOMOG troop that were based there.

  • Witness, who set Kukuna on fire?

  • Well, all of us who went. All of us who went participated in the burning, because we met a military position there. We burnt down Kukuna.

  • What did you burn in Kukuna?

  • Well, the houses in Kukuna. We burnt them down.

  • You said, "We did some killing in Kukuna." Who did you kill in Kukuna?

  • Well, the civilian populace who we found there. Some soldiers who resisted were also killed in Kukuna.

  • Do you recall how many civilians you killed in Kukuna?

  • No, I can't recall the number, because they were strewn in the streets, because when we attacked - when the Guineans put up that resistance when we attacked we killed anyone that we found, so the bodies were strewn in the streets and in the corners.

  • Witness, what did you loot in Kukuna?

  • Well, in Kukuna we took rice, palm oil, many other things of value. As I said, money, anything that was of value, we will take.

  • And these items that were you taking, who did they belong to, do you know?

  • It was civilians in Kukuna who owned these things.

  • Witness, you said that the Red Lion battalion went with you on this attack?

  • Was it the whole battalion?

  • Yes, the whole battalion. The Red Lion battalion. The whole battalion moved.

  • What happened after this operation in Kukuna?

  • Well, after the operation in Kukuna we returned to Colonel Eddie Town and reported and Gullit received the troops. Bazzy explained to him exactly what happened and handed over all the things that we had come with, because after every operation the commander ensured that the rice and anything of value - because after every operation we were searched, everybody was searched, every commander, especially junior commanders, to ensure that if you were found in the possession of money they would take it from you and that would go to the brigade.

  • Who would search the junior commanders?

  • Madam President, I apologise to interrupt. I would be grateful for a time frame, as in date and month, when the Kukuna operation took place.

  • Witness, when did the Kukuna operation take place?

  • Well, this was within October to November, within that time. It was within that time that the Kukuna operation happened.

  • Witness, who would search the junior commanders? You were explaining that earlier.

  • Well, for example this operation that we went on, Bazzy stood, Five-Five stood, the operation Commander Bomb Blast stood to ensure the deputy operation commander, O-Five, to search the commanders who went on the operation to ensure that whatever you had you surrendered.

  • And when you said that would go to the brigade, what do you mean by that?

  • Well, like this operation that we went on, when we returned the brigade commander - sorry, the commander who went with us, that is Gullit - sorry, Bazzy, surrendered these things to the brigade commander.

  • Who was?

  • Tamba Alex Brima.

  • What, if anything, happened after this, witness?

  • Your Honours, I think the witness would like to address you.

  • Mr Witness, yes, what happened?

  • I want to use the gents, Madam.

  • Please assist the witness. Ms Alagendra, if you wish to have a seat.

    Mr Witness, you are ready to proceed now?

  • Yes, my Lord.

  • Please continue, Ms Alagendra.

  • Thank you, your Honour:

  • Witness, what, if anything, happened after the Kukuna operation?

  • Well, we returned and, as I said, the search was conducted and after which Bazzy reported and explained to the commander, who was Tamba Alex Brima. He explained exactly what went on in Kukuna.

  • What happened after this explanation was given?

  • Well, after this Gullit said we should plan another operation to Mange Bureh.

  • Your Honours, for the record Mange Bureh is M-A-N-G-E and the next word is Bureh B-U-R-E-H:

  • Witness, where is Mange Bureh?

  • Mange Bureh is in the Port Loko District.

  • What, if anything, happened after Gullit said this operation should be planned?

  • Well, he also organised a team which was headed by Ibrahim Bioh Sesay, the deputy operation commander O-Five, Abdul Sesay and some other commanders who were appointed. I joined them when we went and attacked Mange Bureh.

  • Your Honours, for the record the witness said Ibrahim Bioh Sesay and deputy operation commander O-Five:

  • Please continue, witness. What happened after this?

  • Well, after this we attacked Mange Bureh and we pushed - we met a mixed force of Guineans and Nigerians who were based in Mange Bureh. We captured one Guinean and a Nigerian soldier at Mange Bureh. We burnt some area of Mange Bureh, looted and returned to the camp.

  • Witness, when you went on this operation to Mange Bureh, where was the Red Lion battalion?

  • Well, the Red Lion battalion was still in their own area. They just took a section of them, a part of them, that joined the Mange Bureh operation, because they just told us that only a small team of ECOMOG troops were based there, so Gullit did not send a large number of troops there. So he just took from the battalion - he just took some from Red Lion battalion and we moved.

  • When you say, "We burnt some area of Mange Bureh", what did you burn in Mange Bureh?

  • Well, the houses, because Mange Bureh is very large so we ensured that we burnt part of Mange Bureh.

  • What did you loot in Mange Bureh?

  • Well, in Mange Bureh we looted because we were looking for rice and anything of value, money and whatever was of value. Those were the things we looted in Mange Bureh, a lot of things.

  • Now, witness, you said some members of the Red Lion battalion went with your group on this operation and you have explained that the Red Lion battalion comprised of the STFs.

  • The NPFL/AFL fighters and the RUF.

  • The members of the Red Lion battalion that were with your group for this operation, who were they?

  • Well, they chose a few from the SLA, a few from the STF and AFL - sorry, former NPFL/AFL fighters. They chose from them. They just chose a small number for them to join us.

  • Did anything happen after the operation in Mange Bureh?

  • Well, as I said, we captured one Guinean and a Nigerian soldier and we returned to the camp and reported to Gullit and Bioh Sesay handed over all the things that we had come with to the brigade.

  • Did anything happen after this?

  • Well, what happened after this in the camp was that we had a small dispute in the camp in relation to witchcraft.

  • Can you explain briefly this incident?

  • Well, Gullit accused Bioh Sesay that he was a wizard and after Gullit had done that Bioh Sesay said, well, if Gullit was accusing him then he would expose what Gullit was doing in the camp because Gullit had taken --

  • Excuse me, your Honours, can the witness repeat?

  • Just pause. The interpreter has a bit of a cough. Now, let us go back and let the interpreter pick up. Bioh Sesay said if Gullit was accusing him he would expose what Gullit had done in the camp. Please pick up from there, Mr Witness.

  • As I said, Bioh said Gullit was accusing him of witchcraft. He said but if Gullit continued his accusation he will expose exactly what Gullit had done in the camp. He said Gullit had taken two young girl children who were virgins and Colonel Eddie and they have buried them in that Tonko Limba area as a form of sacrifice. So this was on when Gullit ordered O-Five to go and arrest Bioh.

    So whilst this was going on Bomb Blast, who was operation commander, intervened. He said O-Five had no right to arrest Bioh. Since he was the deputy operation commander, that is O-Five, he, the operation commander, was the one that Gullit was to order to do the arrest. So this dispute erupted and it resulted in an infighting and this caused O-Five to go to Junior Sherrif and the Red Lion battalion and told them that there was dispute in the camp and they moved and came to the camp and arrested Bomb Blast, Bioh and Five-Five, Bazzy and Gullit.

    During these arrests O-Five told Gullit and Five-Five that if they were going to unite then they will be handed over to the government, because at that time the government also went on the air and said they were going to declare amnesty for us the fighters who had gone into the bush. So the government said they do not want the passengers, but the drivers. So O-Five said if that trend was to continue then they, the drivers, Gullit and others will be handed over to the government then we will go and benefit from the amnesty.

    So this happened in the camp and Gullit and others apologised and said they would settle the dispute. So they released Gullit, Five-Five, Bazzy, and Bomb Blast and Bioh stayed in detention. They were put under mess arrest. So whilst this was happening in the camp we received communication when SAJ Musa called in the camp --

  • Witness, I am going to ask you to pause. Can you be clear on who were buried in the Tonko Limba area by Gullit?

  • Well, according to Bioh who revealed this thing - but the rumour was doing the rounds, but it was Bioh who revealed it because he too was a senior commander. He said two young virgins, girl children, were buried as a form of sacrifice, Gullit buried them as a form of sacrifice.

  • Did he say what happened to those two girls who were buried?

  • Well, he said they buried them alive. They dug a pit and they buried them alive. They were covered. He said that was what happened.

  • Did anything happen to them as a result of being buried alive, do you know?

  • My Lord, as I said, it was a sacrifice. He said the girls were buried alive. Well, it is apparent that they died in there.

  • The witness said something to do with Eddie Town. I don't know if the incident took place at Eddie Town or whether the burial was done by Gullit with the assistance of Colonel Eddie Town. He said something about Eddie Town.

  • Witness, while explaining what happened to these two girls you mentioned the name Colonel Eddie. Can you explain in what context you mentioned that name?

  • As I said, Ibrahim Bioh said Gullit and Lieutenant Colonel Eddie took two virgin children from Colonel Eddie Town and took them to the Tonko Limba Chiefdom, that area, and sacrificed them by burying them alive.

  • Witness, this infight that you have just been describing, do you recall how it ended?

  • Well, as I said, during this infighting Gullit was released and Ibrahim Bazzy Kamara and Five-Five, Abdul Sesay, Woyoh, all of them were released. And they detained Hassan Papa Bangura and Bioh Sesay and automatically Gullit appointed O-Five to become the operation commander.

  • Witness, did anything happen to the positions of Gullit, Five-Five or Bazzy as a result of this incident?

  • Nothing happened, because later we learnt that it was Gullit who organised all of this thing that had happened just so that the other men would subdue themselves to him, because there was a meeting summoned by Gullit for the commanders who were the military supervisors and he told them that if SAJ Musa were to come then SAJ Musa should subdue himself and take orders from him. He said because they overthrew the SLPP government. They only invited SAJ Musa to join them.

    So there was this disagreement between them whereby Bioh and Hassan Papa Bangura disagreed, saying, no, that man even during the days of the SLA he had become an officer and had also become a vice-president during the NPRC reign, so we should not just - because the man was coming, we should not just allow him to subdue himself. So because of this, according to what we heard, Gullit manipulated and used O-Five to cause an infighting in the camp. So nothing happened to him.

  • I heard the witness say that they the older men would subdue themselves and the record shows the order men. Could we clarify that, please, Ms Alagendra? I am looking now at line 15.

  • Yes, your Honour:

  • Witness, you said that it was Gullit who organised all of this thing that happened just so that something men would subdue themselves to him. Can you describe what type of men are you talking about that would subdue themselves to him?

  • Well, as I said, he said so that the SAJ Musa will subdue and work under him.

  • Witness, you said Hassan Papa Bangura was detained as a result of this incident?

  • Well, as I said, just after this disagreement when Hassan Papa Bangura and Bioh did - automatically Gullit accused Bioh Sesay of witchcraft and ordered O-Five to go and arrest Bioh and this resulted in the dispute and infighting and the arrest of all of them. And I said Gullit was released, Bazzy, Five-Five, Abdul Sesay, Coachy Borno and Franklyn Conteh otherwise known as Woyoh, they were all released. Gullit automatically appointed O-Five to become the operation commander.

  • In relation to Hassan Papa Bangura being detained, for how long was he detained?

  • Well, Hassan Papa Bangura was in detention up to the time SAJ Musa arrived in the camp.

  • How long was that in terms of a time period?

  • Within that week that the arrests were done. It was during that week that SAJ Musa arrived.

  • Did anything happen to his position as a result of this incident?

  • As I said, Gullit transformed him from being the operation commander and appointed --

  • Your Honours, can the witness kindly take that again. There is an ambiguity in his answer.

  • Which part of the answer, Mr Interpreter?

  • Mr Witness, the interpreter is not clear on what you're saying. Could you explain better what you mean by the change and repeat your answer.

  • I said after Gullit had been released Five-Five, Bazzy and the other supervisors had been released, Gullit replaced Bomb Blast's appointment and appointed O-Five as the operation commander.

  • After Hassan Papa Bangura was released, did he have an appointment?

  • Well, the only thing was that when SAJ Musa arrived he became one of the military supervisors and SAJ sent them to the battlefront. They went ahead to organise all battles.

  • Who became the military supervisor?

  • Well, Hassan Papa Bangura made him a military supervisor and they continued to stay at the battlefront.

  • Who continued to stay at the battlefront?

  • Hassan Papa Bangura.

  • Witness, when did SAJ Musa arrive in Colonel Eddie Town?

  • Well, this happened in early December. SAJ Musa came in early December, yes, 1998, just after this infighting had taken place. About a week after - a week or two after the infighting SAJ Musa called and said that he had left Koinadugu, he said because he had clashed with Superman. He said they had had an infighting, but he has left Koinadugu and he was heading for Colonel Eddie Town.

  • Ms Alagendra, you asked the witness, "After Hassan Papa Bangura was released, did he have an appointment" and then his answer is that, "Well, after SAJ Musa arrived he became one of the military supervisors and SAJ sent them to the battlefront" and the witness further continues, "Well, Hassan Papa Bangura made him a military supervisor." Now I am not sure at this stage whether it was SAJ Musa who was the military supervisor or whether he has answered your question, "After Hassan Papa Bangura was released did he have an appointment?" I am not sure.

  • I will clarify that, your Honour:

  • Witness, can you be clear on whether Hassan Papa Bangura received an appointment after he was released.

  • As I said, it was after the arrival of SAJ Musa then Hassan Papa Bangura was appointed as a military supervisor. SAJ put him at the battlefront.

  • Witness, when did this communication take place?

  • Well, this communication happened just a week after the infighting had taken place in Colonel Eddie Town.

  • How do you know about this communication?

  • Well, at that time I was at the headquarters after my promotion, because I have not mentioned that, but I came to visit at the headquarters when this infighting happened and that was the time that this communication took place.

  • Apart from this communication with SAJ Musa - let me just go back a little bit. During this communication SAJ Musa was communicating with who?

  • SAJ Musa called Gullit, who was the head of the brigade administration, the chief in command, and he informed him that he had had an infighting with Superman. For that reason he was heading for Colonel Eddie Town.

  • Apart from this communication between SAJ Musa and Gullit, during this particular time do you know if there were any other communications?

  • Well, as far as I can recall, Gullit had also communicated with Mosquito in Kailahun. That also had happened in Colonel Eddie Town when he communicated with Mosquito. He briefed him on most especially the Kukuna operation and the Mange Bureh operation.

  • How do you know this?

  • Well, this happened - for instance, the Kukuna operation, when we came back Gullit mounted the set and called and told Mosquito. He also told SAJ Musa on the latest developments, which was the attack on Kukuna.

  • Who did he speak to first in relation to the operation in Kukuna and Mange Bureh?

  • Well, whenever we had an operation Mosquito was the first person that Gullit informed before informing SAJ.

  • Do you recall any other communications that took place?

  • No, well, the ones that I was present at are the ones I can recall.

  • What happened after this communication with SAJ Musa?

  • Well, SAJ said he should organise a team that will meet him so that he would be able to locate the camp. So Gullit organised a team that went and they returned with SAJ to the camp.

  • Witness, at this time did you know where Issa Sesay was?

  • Well, according to the communications that we were receiving, Issa was within that Kailahun axis. He too was there.

  • What communication are you referring to?

  • After this Kukuna operation, Gullit also spoke with Issa Sesay and explained to him about the activities that we had undertaken.

  • At this time do you know where Rambo of the RUF was?

  • Well, RUF Rambo, from the monitoring that we were doing, he was based around that Kono axis. They were within that Kono axis. RUF Rambo had this Isaac Mongor, they were around that area. Peter Vandi and others, they were all around that area.

  • When you say "from the monitoring that we were doing", what are you talking about?

  • Well, the radio men always monitored the various communications that went on and during that, most times they would present this monitoring that they did and we would present the information and take it to the commander, or the operation commander and they will have access - for instance, they had a logbook where they entered information. For instance, if they monitored any activity, be it from the enemy force, or the RUF, or the SLA, that is those of us who were in the bush, they would present that to the commander and he will refer them also to the operation commander so that they will know exactly what was going on in all the areas that we were occupying; that is those areas where the junta troops were.

  • Who are you referring to when you say junta troops?

  • All the areas where RUF and SLAs were based: Gandorhun area, the other areas where they were based, within that Daru axis. Through the monitoring we were able to know where our men were based and the activities that were going on, especially in the areas of attacks, those attacks - those various areas they were attacking. Through the monitoring the record will be there and the radio man will bring this record to the commander. Whatever he had received that day, he will take to him. The commander will sign it and they will also show that to the operation commander to let him know what was going on where SLAs and RUFs were occupying.

  • How do you know this?

  • Well, I was able to know this because I was with the operation commander and whenever those things, like when the radio man sends the runner, they always ensure that whatever communication came, or if they received any information through their monitoring they ensured that it was shared with the commander who will then pass it on to the operation commander, so that if there was any enemy threats all the battalions would be alerted that there is an enemy threat that had been monitored.

  • Witness, are you able to say, when the troops were in Colonel Eddie Town, how many times Gullit spoke to Mosquito over the radio?

  • Well, at the time that I was present, from what I can recall, this was the one time that I was present that he made a call to Hassan Papa Bangura and others, but I can't recall of any other at which I was present.

  • Who made a call to Hassan Papa Bangura?

  • What I mean is when Gullit made this call to Mosquito, when he called upon Hassan Papa Bangura and the military supervisors.

  • Did SAJ Musa arrive in Colonel Eddie Town?

  • You did say he arrived in early December 1998, is that not right?

  • Yes, sir. Mid-December, sorry, mid-December.

  • Who did SAJ Musa come with?

  • Well, SAJ Musa also came along with some SLAs and he had some RUFs that were with him.

  • Are you able to say the number of men that came with SAJ Musa?

  • Well, the SLAs actually dominated the RUFs that arrived, but the number that came were 200 or so, 200 to 250 that SAJ Musa came with.

  • Apart from SLA and RUF who were the others in the group?

  • Well, as I said, he also came with a few STFs. There were STFs with him, but they were few those who joined him, because he explained how exactly things had happened to him.

  • What, if anything, happened after SAJ Musa arrived in Colonel Eddie Town with his men?

  • Well, when SAJ Musa came he reorganised the brigade wherein he became the chief in command, Gullit became the deputy chief in command and he also increased the battalion and he formed the RDF battalion, Rapid Deployment Force, to which he appointed Lamin Sidique - Lieutenant Colonel Lamin Sidique whom we also called Terminator. He headed the RDF battalion and also he made an appointment. We had the BFI that added on to the brigade, the battlefield inspector, which was Lieutenant Colonel Konjor. Then he also brought Adamu, we used to call him Chicken Soup, he also appointed him as one of the military supervisors. He also brought Gold Teeth, we used to call him Tarawalli. His name is Tarawalli, but his aka is Gold Teeth and he was also appointed as one of the military supervisors. He made some other changes. He made some other changes when he arrived.

  • Your Honours, for the record the witness said BFI meaning battlefield inspector and he named Lamin Sidique, L-A-M-I-N and the next word is S-I-D-I-Q-U-E.

  • Ms Alagendra, there were so many names. I wonder if you could begin with the first appointment, a lieutenant colonel somebody. On the record I think the transcriber didn't even get that name.

  • Konjor, your Honour.

  • Yes, start at the beginning of those names.

  • Konjor is spelt K-O-N-J-O-R and the witness mentioned the name Adamu, A-D-A-M-U.

  • Adamu's aka was Chicken Soup.

  • No, Konjor was - what was Konjor's aka? Lieutenant Konjor was called?

  • Lieutenant Colonel Konjor. He was the BFI, his appointment was BFI, battlefield inspector.

  • Actually, your Honour, before mentioning Colonel Konjor the witness referred to Lamin Sidique who is Terminator. Terminator is spelt T-E-R-M-I-N-A-T-O-R.

  • Yes. Did you spell Sidique?

  • Yes, I did, your Honour. It is up on the record, S-I-D-I-Q-U-E:

  • Witness, did anything else happen in this meeting after SAJ Musa made these appointments?

  • Well, actually SAJ Musa explained and he was even angry. He said the way things happened to him in Koinadugu, he explained to us what happened between himself and Superman. He said in spite of that they were brothers and the operation should continue. He was angry. He even said that the RUF should be disarmed. Some of the STFs and some of the Liberian guys who had come should be disarmed, but the commanders told him that, "No, Pa, we don't have any problem with these people, it was just an infighting and we have an operational head." So SAJ Musa later forgot about them and he said even the women whom we had should be released, because we were on operation heading for Freetown, we should not take women along. So the commanders met and spoke to SAJ. He said if they released the women now they will be at risk because they have been with us for that long. They will be at risk and he agreed.

    SAJ Musa also told us the troop was about to leave for Freetown. He said as the troop was going, he said we should strictly obey the humanitarian laws that govern us. He said because since he had gone to London to study law he has returned to defend the SLAs that had gone into the bush. So he was warning us against anything that was evil. As we were moving we should not amputate or burn houses. He said as we were going we should go saying that we are going to reinforce - sorry, we should go saying we were going to reinstate the army so that we would get support from the people by saying that. So SAJ warned us and they said the troop should be prepared to advance on Freetown.

  • Were the women released?

  • No, no, no. As I said, the commanders met and all of them apologised. They appealed and said that they should not release the women. They should still continue to stay with the troop. So SAJ agreed.

  • Were any of the RUF, STF or the Liberian fighters disarmed?

  • No, no, no, because he too came with an RUF commander called Alfred Brown. He was a radio man who was with him. He came with some of them. So he just tried to put that across to them, but everybody said, "No, sir, let us continue the operation."

  • Did SAJ Musa say anything else?

  • Well, as far as I can recall, as I said, this was one of the things he said and, as I said, he made these appointments and addressed the troop saying that we should be well prepared for an advance. He said because this was something that had been prepared, this was something that had been prepared and that he was expecting - he and Superman should come to Colonel Eddie Town to advance. He said even though the infighting had happened, that should not deter them. He said they should continue and they would clear the other points as they went along.

  • That the infighting should not deter who?

  • He said the infighting should not stop the programme that had been organised whereby they had released reinforcement, that is SAJ and Superman, to come and join us so as to advance on Freetown. He said that should not stop the movement. He said all the differences should be put aside and we should focus entering Freetown.

  • Who was saying all this, witness?

  • It was SAJ Musa who said all of this when he was talking to the brigade. He said all of this.

  • Witness, when SAJ was talking about reinforcements that were released by SAJ and Superman, do you know who are the reinforcements he is talking about?

  • Well, yes, my Lord. As I said, SAJ said that was why he and Superman had sent ahead the mixed troops comprising the SLA, the STF, the RUF and the former NPFL fighters who came to reinforce and were in waiting for him and Superman to advance to Freetown whilst the others in the rear will also move.

  • After the arrival of SAJ Musa to Colonel Eddie Town, did the troops leave Colonel Eddie Town at some point?

  • Yes, we finally departed Colonel Eddie Town around December, mid-December. We left Colonel Eddie Town when SAJ arrived in 1998 and crossed the river towards Mange Bureh.

  • Who left Colonel Eddie Town?

  • SAJ Musa and the entire brigade including the family members as I have mentioned, that is those whom we had captured and who were with us. As I said, we protected them and we called them family members.

  • And where did the entire group move to?

  • Well, at that time we had the 5th Battalion which was ahead, headed by Basky, Lieutenant Colonel Basky, that is Saidu Kambolai. We also had the RDF battalion and the Red Lion battalion also moved. They went ahead to advance towards Freetown - towards, sorry, Mange Bureh.

  • Your Honours, the spelling is Basky, B-A-S-K-Y, Saidu Kambolai is S-A-I-D-U K-A-M-B-O-L-A-I:

  • Witness, just to be clear, at this point when the troops left Colonel Eddie Town, can you tell us how many battalions the groups were divided into?

  • Well, we had the 1st Battalion, the 2nd Battalion, the #rd Battalion, we had the 4th Battalion, 5th Battalion. We also had the RDF and the Red Lion battalion.

  • Was the RDF and the Red Lion battalion considered as one battalion?

  • No, no, no, my Lord. The RDF battalion was there headed by Lieutenant Colonel Terminator. We also had the Red Lion battalion which was headed by Lieutenant Colonel Med Bajehjeh.

  • Ms Alagendra, I don't believe we have heard of the 5th Battalion until now.

  • I was coming to that, your Honour:

  • Witness, you have just spoken about a 5th Battalion. When did the 5th Battalion come into place?

  • Well, actually this was organised by Gullit. It was Gullit that organised the 5th Battalion. Before the arrival of SAJ the 5th Battalion had been in existence. We had the 4th Battalion, the 5th Battalion and we had the Red Lion battalion.

  • When precisely did the 5th Battalion come into place?

  • Well, the 5th Battalion came into existence, as I said, just after the arrival of O-Five. It was then that the 5th Battalion came into existence. I did not name it before.

  • Was a commander appointed for the 5th Battalion?

  • Do you recall who it was?

  • Yes, it was Lieutenant Colonel Basky.

  • Did he have any other name?

  • Witness, the troops that left Colonel Eddie Town, where did you all go to?

  • Well, as I said, we headed towards Mange Bureh.

  • After Mange Bureh did you go anywhere else?

  • Yes, we attacked Mange Bureh and headed towards the Port Loko area.

  • Did you go to any specific place in the Port Loko area?

  • Well, there was a village which they called Maraykula. We attacked Maraykula and Five-Five who was at the rear had to burn down - ordered that Maraykula be burnt so Maraykula was set on fire.

  • Your Honours, Maraykula is M-A-R-A-Y-K-U-L-A:

  • Who set Maraykula on fire?

  • Well, Five-Five and the other men who were with him, because Maraykula was a place we almost rested. Some people went - some men went to the jungle and others were in the town, so Five-Five put that village on fire.

  • What was put on fire in the village?

  • Did the group move anywhere after Maraykula?

  • Yes, we left Maraykula and headed towards Lunsar - the Lunsar axis.

  • Just to be clear, where is Lunsar?

  • Lunsar is in the Bombali District.

  • Did anything happen in Lunsar?

  • Well, we set up a temporary place at a place called Mamusa. That was where we created the temporary base. And then SAJ said we should attack Lunsar, because we had received information from monitoring that ECOMOG base was at Lunsar. So we appointed Colonel Terminator and other men who joined and we attacked Lunsar.

  • Did anything happen during the attack on Lunsar?

  • Well, yes. We captured some military ammunition from Lunsar from the ECOMOG forces who were there and we withdrew.

  • Where did you withdraw to?

  • We returned to Mamusa.

  • Did the group move from Mamusa at some point?

  • Yes, my Lord, but I left out something because when we left Colonel Eddie Town and advanced towards Mange Bureh, as I said, we were ambushed and SAJ Musa said that the officers who were involved should be demoted, they should be reprimanded until they prove themselves. So about seven of us who were involved in that ambush who were second lieutenants were reprimanded and SAJ said we should continue at the front until we proved ourselves. It was then that we finally attacked Mange Bureh.

  • When you were demoted was there a change in your rank?

  • He reprimanded us and said we should go as sergeants. All of us who were involved in that ambush should hold the positions of sergeants until we proved well. But he said we should stay at the battlefront. He must not see us at the rear. We should be in the front until we proved ourselves, because it was during that ambush that they killed some of our men.

  • Did the group move from Mamusa at some point?

  • Yes, my Lord, we left Mamusa and advanced towards Gberi junction. Gberi bridge and Gberi junction. Gberi junction, sorry.

  • Your Honours, perhaps this is a convenient time to stop.

  • Very well, Ms Alagendra. Mr Witness, we are now going to take the mid-morning break. We will resume court again at 12 o'clock. Please adjourn court until 12.

  • [Break taken at 11.29 a.m.]

  • [Upon resuming at 12.00 p.m.]

  • Ms Alagendra, please proceed.

  • Your Honours, can I ask that the witness be given the map of Bombali District.

  • Your Honours, before that the interpreter would like to make a correction.

  • Yes, Mr Interpreter, what is that correction?

  • The witness spoke about a base and he used the words "temporal base" and it was inadvertently interpreted by the interpreter as "temporal base". It actually should be interpreted as temporary base.

  • Thank you. We will have to find out on the record and have it noted accordingly.

  • The map you referred to is Bombali, is it, Ms Alagendra?

  • That is right, your Honour. It appears at S5 of the map book.

  • Ms Alagendra, whatever you said was not on the record because I think your microphone was not on, or something.

  • Yes, I will just repeat that. I was asking that the witness be shown the map of Bombali District, which appears at the page marked S5 of the map book.

    Your Honours, the procedure that was used previously was that the map was removed from the sleeve and put onto the screen and the witness was marking the locations as we went. He was also provided with a black marker like pen for him to circle the locations and another colour which he used to write the numbers.

  • Black?

  • One black and the other pen used was blue. He used the black to circle and the blue to write the numbers. Thank you.

  • Are we ready to proceed?

  • I am, your Honour. I was just checking whether the witness was ready.

  • Have we ascertained yet if the witness is able to read the map?

  • I will ask him, your Honour:

  • Witness, can you clarify for the Court your ability to read maps?

  • Is that sufficient, your Honour?

  • Thank you, your Honour.

  • Obviously, if it is to be challenged it will be challenged.

  • Witness, the map in front of you it says on top of it that it is the map of Bombali District, Sierra Leone. I am going to ask you to - witness, I am going to ask you to look at this map in front of you and I am going to ask you to mark some of the locations in Bombali District that you have named in the course of your testimony these last few days. Is that all right?

  • Yes, my Lord.

  • Witness, you referred to a place called Karina. Do you see Karina on the map?

  • Could you circle Karina on the map and can you put a number 1 next to Karina. You referred to a place Gbendembu in the course of your testimony. Can you find Gbendembu on the map?

  • Can you circle Gbendembu.

  • Could you move the map so we can see on the screen, because we can't.

  • Put a number 2 next to it, please, witness. You referred to Rosos in the course of your testimony. Do you see Rosos on the map?

  • Can you circle it and put a number 3 next to Rosos.

  • We can't see anything. We can't. We can't see what it is he has circled.

  • Perhaps it can be zoomed in a little bit:

  • Witness, you referred to Mateboi in your testimony. Do you see it on the map?

  • Did the witness put a 3 against Rosos? It doesn't look like he did.

  • Witness, can you put a number 3 next to Rosos, please. Can you circle Mateboi on the map?

  • Yes, my Lord.

  • And put a number 4 next to it. In your testimony to the Court you stated that Major Eddie Town which later became Colonel Eddie Town was situated in between the Tonko Limba Chiefdom and the Sanda Magbolontor Chiefdom. Do you recall that?

  • Yes, my Lord.

  • Could you first circle Tonko Limba Chiefdom on the map, please. Put a number 5 next to that. Do you see Sanda Magbolontor Chiefdom on the map?

  • Could you circle that and put a number 6 next to that. Witness, would you be able to tell the Court where exactly Colonel Eddie Town was located on this map?

  • Well, I don't have the right name for Colonel Eddie Town. It is between Sanda Magbolontor, it is not too far from Madina to Kantia, because from Kantia to Colonel Eddie Town is not too far away, also from Madina --

  • Your Honours, can the witness take it slowly.

  • A little slower for the interpreter, Mr Witness, please. Mr Interpreter, have you got all the answer?

  • No, your Honour.

  • Tell me where you have lost? Where did you lose it?

  • Let him repeat everything, your Honour.

  • Mr Witness, you were saying about Madina. You said also from Madina. Can you continue from there, please?

  • I said Madina is not too far away from Colonel Eddie Town. I also mentioned Kantia which is also not too far away from our base which was Colonel Eddie Town.

  • Witness, by looking at the map would you be able to point to the Court where Colonel Eddie Town is? If you can just answer the question first before looking at the map. Could you, or could you not?

  • I can locate from the map. I can just not recall the name of the village.

  • That is fine. Can you look at the map and where you say Colonel Eddie Town was located could you put an X in that place. Could you put a number 7 next to that, please, witness. Do you see Madina on the map?

  • Yes, my Lord.

  • Can you circle Madina and put a number 8 next to Madina. Do you see Kantia on the map?

  • Yes, my Lord.

  • Can you circle Kantia and put a number 9 next to that. Do you see Kukuna on the map?

  • Can you circle Kukuna and put a number 10 next to that, please. Do you see Makeni on the map?

  • Yes, my Lord.

  • Could you circle Makeni and put a number 11 next to that, please. Thank you, witness. Your Honours, this will be all the markings for the Bombali District map. Your Honours, can I ask that this map be marked for identification MFI-22, I believe.

  • I think that is correct. Now a one page document, a map headed "Bombali District - Sierra Leone" as marked by the witness with numbers and circles from 1 to 11 is marked for identification MFI-22. Yes, please proceed, Ms Alagendra.

  • Thank you, your Honour:

  • Witness, just before the break you told the Court that you left Mamusa and you advanced towards Gberi junction. In that same answer you also said Gberi bridge and Gberi junction. Can you be a bit more precise as to where the troops moved to from Mamusa?

  • From Mamusa we headed towards Gberi junction.

  • Where is Gberi junction?

  • Gberi junction is also between the Port Loko District and Bombali District. It is a junction between Port Loko District and Bombali District.

  • Your Honours, Gberi junction was spelt correctly earlier, so I am going to leave the record for later correction.

  • That is Port Loko junction. Was that Port Loko junction?

  • That is what I heard, your Honour:

  • Did you go to any other place from Gberi junction?

  • Well, the troop moved for Gberi bridge.

  • And from Gberi bridge did the troop move anywhere else?

  • Well, we encountered a small target where we met the Kamajors. We flushed them and advanced ahead towards Mansumana axis, that was Masiaka, Mansumana axis.

  • When you arrived at the Mansumana axis in Masiaka did you hear anything?

  • Yes, when we approached Masiaka, Mansumana axis, we got news from the international media where the Government of Sierra Leone claimed that they had flushed the junta troops, that was the AFRC/RUF troops that was heading for Freetown, that they had flushed them out and Masiaka was their defensive and no troop will cross Masiaka.

  • Did anything happen after you heard this news?

  • Yes, my Lord.

  • Well, immediately SAJ Musa called on the brigade administration and said we were to organise a troop to attack Masiaka immediately, so to destroy the defensive made by the government at Masiaka.

  • What happened after SAJ Musa passed this instruction?

  • Well, manpower was gathered together from the different battalions and organised themselves and advanced on Masiaka. Papa 17, Colonel Papa - Lieutenant Colonel Papa, his aka was Papa 17, was appointed by SAJ Musa who led the troop to attack Masiaka.

  • Witness, just to be clear, this Colonel Papa, is he a different person from Hassan Papa Bangura?

  • Yes, my Lord, he is a different person. Papa 17 - because that was the way we used to call him - he came along with SAJ Musa's group. He is different from Colonel Hassan Papa Bangura who was the operation commander.

  • Sorry to interrupt - you are going to ask the same question as I was going to ask. Please continue.

  • Are you saying Papa 70 or Papa 17?

  • Papa 17. One seven.

  • Thank you, witness. Did anything happen after Papa 17 was appointed to lead the troops?

  • Yes, my Lord.

  • Well, I also joined the troop. Together, like I have said the demoted officers that SAJ Musa had said they should engage at the front line to prove themselves, we went and attacked Masiaka, but on our first attempt we were unable to capture the ground. It was only the second attempt that we entered Masiaka.

  • Did anything happen when you entered Masiaka?

  • What happened?

  • Well we encountered stiff resistance from the Guineans who were based at Masiaka, but we were able to dislodge them and got some ammunition from the Guineans who were based there. I also captured an SPG, which is a support propelled grenade. We lost a commander, he was killed during the battle, Papa 17, after which houses were burnt in Lunsar - and I am sorry in Masiaka and some Guineans were killed. We - they retreated from Masiaka. We retreated from Masiaka and came back to the temporary base and reported to SAJ.

  • Witness, who were the Guineans based in Masiaka?

  • Well, this was the troop that was with ECOMOG. They were part of the ECOMOG troop that were based in Sierra Leone.

  • Who burnt houses in Masiaka?

  • Well, myself and the other commanders. I mean, the troop that entered Masiaka. We set fire to the houses in Masiaka.

  • You said you returned back to base. Where did you return to?

  • Well, we went back to the base between Mansumana and Masiaka axis where we made our temporary base.

  • Witness, when you returned to this temporary base did anything happen? Did anything happen to your rank?

  • Yes, SAJ Musa recommended me and one Amidu Kamara called Keforkeh. He said automatically we should be promoted to captain for the bravery and the capture of the SPG.

  • Witness, can you repeat the name again, please?

  • Amidu Kamara, AKA Keforkeh.

  • Your Honours, Amidu is A-M-I-D-U Kamara and Keforkeh is K-E-F-O-R-K-E-H:

  • Witness, is Keforkeh an alias?

  • What happened after this, witness?

  • Well after base SAJ Musa said troops should go to the highway and ensure that they tried to ambush the ECOMOG troop passing on that highway, so Colonel Terminator was appointed and some other men. They went to the highway, they ambushed two ECOMOG vehicles that were moving from Masiaka to the Waterloo Highway and we succeeded in ambushing them and then we returned to the base.

  • Now you say, "They went to the highway, they ambushed two ECOMOG", and then you say, "we succeeded in ambushing". Who was involved in this ambush?

  • Like I said, Colonel Terminator was the leader. It was a mixed group. Colonel Terminator was the commander, Lamin Sidique, who led the ambush team, and we at the end succeeded. I was with them, we succeeded in ambushing the ECOMOG force and then later the two vehicles were burnt and then we returned to the temporary base.

  • Did anything happen when you returned to the temporary base?

  • Also, SAJ Musa also appointed Terminator and selected some other people to go and disorganise the base at Mile 38 that he had got an information that ECOMOG were there. There also Terminator led the group together with some others and attacked Magbuntoso, which was Mile 38, and they succeeded in pushing the ECOMOG forces there. They also retreated, but indeed the leader, Terminator, was shot, he sustained injury, so we retreated and came back to SAJ.

  • Is Mile 38 known by any other name?

  • Well, the name --

  • Just a moment, please. Mr Anyah, you are --

  • Yes, I would be grateful for some indication as to the time frame for the attack on Mile 38.

  • Ms Alagendra, you have heard the application.

  • I will do that, your Honour.

  • I also thought the witness said Mile 38 was Magbuntoso. He already said that.

  • Yes, your Honour, I see it. I apologise.

  • We need the spelling though.

  • Magbuntoso, your Honour, is spelt M-A-G-B-U-N-T-O-S-O:

  • Witness, this attack on Mile 38, when did it take place?

  • Well, this was early end of December in 1998.

  • What is "early end of December"?

  • Witness, what do you mean by "early end of December"?

  • This happened towards the Christmas. We were going towards the Christmas in 1998, in December. It was around the 20-something in December 1998.

  • Did the troops move anywhere after Mile 38?

  • Yes, after they returned SAJ Musa said the entire troop should advance and so we had to advance towards RDF. This was a brigade advance. ECOMOG retreated from RDF. We advanced towards Mamamah. Yes, we went and based at Mamamah.

  • What is RDF?

  • Well, this was a base settled by the NPRC called Rapid Deployment Force with the Sierra Leone Army heart.

  • Your Honours, Mamamah is spelt M-A-M-A-H [sic]:

  • Witness, where is Mile 38 located?

  • Mile 38 is between Koya rural district.

  • Where is RDF located?

  • It is also within that same area, Koya rural district.

  • Mamamah too is within with Koya rural district.

  • And where is Koya rural district?

  • Well, this is between the west end - I mean within the Western Area, but it is also a district by itself that is called Koya rural district. It is not too far from Masiaka.

  • Now, Ms Alagendra, when the witness says, "Mile 38 is between Koya rural district", does he mean within Koya rural district?

  • Witness, can you clarify that for the Court, please?

  • Mile 38 is within Koya rural district. Mile 38, Mamamah, RDF are all within Koya rural district.

  • Witness, when the troops arrived at Mamamah, did anything happen?

  • Well, yes, we listened to an announcement over the international media and General Mosquito went over the air and said the troop is moving towards Freetown and that they have captured a military strategic base which was RDF and they were heading for Freetown. Then he said also from the rear they are coming and they were advancing towards Kono and they will move to capture Daru.

  • Witness, in this broadcast that you heard, do you recall if General Mosquito said anything about who were the troops that captured RDF?

  • Well, he said his men that, "We are moving towards Freetown". He said his men that were moving, the AFRC and RUF joint force that were moving towards Freetown, had captured a military strategic base which was RDF and that they were moving towards Freetown. He said the other forces are also moving to capture Kono and Daru as well.

  • Did he specify which other forces?

  • Yes, he said the AFRC/RUF forces are moving from all angles.

  • Witness, how long after your group captured RDF did this announcement come on?

  • It was just after we captured there and based at Mamamah that the announcement came up.

  • Did anything happen as a result of this broadcast?

  • Yes, my Lord, as far as I can recall.

  • Well SAJ Musa called Alfred Brown, who was one of the radio men, and he was angry with him that he was giving information to Mosquito and he was not happy with that. He said he will not subject himself under the control of Mosquito. So he was not happy with that because Mosquito was an SBU and so he was angry with Alfred Brown, but later the other commanders spoke to him so --

  • So?

  • Let go of Alfred Brown.

  • Okay, witness, I want to clarify a few issues out of this answer. Firstly, witness, you testified earlier about an RUF commander called Alfred Brown and here you are talking about Alfred Brown who was one of the radio men. Were there two Alfred Browns in your group?

  • No, my Lord. Like I have said earlier, I said Alfred Brown came together with SAJ Musa. He was a radio man. They came together to Colonel Eddie Town. This very Alfred Brown was the one SAJ Musa was angry with.

  • Which group did Alfred Brown belong to?

  • Alfred Brown was an RUF. He was with the RUF.

  • Now can you explain to us what you mean by SAJ Musa saying he was not happy with that because Mosquito was an SBU?

  • Well, just as I said, because of that infighting that happened with SAJ in Koinadugu he said there are no longer any differences, but the troops should advance, because that was their earlier plan, that there should be a brigade advance to Freetown. He said he should not link up with or give any information to Mosquito.

  • Witness, you still haven't explained what you meant when you said because Mosquito was an SBU, just that phrase.

  • Mr Witness, do you understand the question?

  • Yes, my Lord. SAJ said Mosquito was not a trained man. He said SAJ, he was a trained military man who had gone through military courses. He said Mosquito should not - now that he is advancing, should not control him. He said the main aim was to advance and capture Freetown. There was no need to take command from him until they have captured Freetown.

  • Who called Mosquito an SBU?

  • It was SAJ Musa who said Mosquito was an SBU to him.

  • And this explanation you have just provided, who gave this explanation?

  • Well, it was SAJ who said that.

  • After Mamamah did the troops move anywhere else?

  • Yes, my Lord. The ECOMOG started bombarding that area, so we moved ahead to Newton and we captured Newton.

  • Newton is close to - after Waterloo we have Newton. It too is in the Koya rural district.

  • How long did the troops remain in Newton?

  • Well, we were there until during the night. We spent some hours at Newton. Towards nightfall SAJ said we should advance to capture Waterloo and advance on to Benguema.

  • Did the troops advance to Waterloo?

  • Yes, before we advanced we declared born naked, Operation Born Naked wherein all of us removed our uniforms that we were wearing, our uniform shirts and tied it around our waist so that we will be able to identify ourselves. If you were putting something on we will know that you were an enemy. After which we advanced to capture Waterloo.

  • Witness, who declared Operation Born Naked?

  • Well, it was SAJ Musa. He said so that we will be able to identify one another because it was a night combat. Everybody should remove the uniform shirt that you had and tie it, so whoever was not in that form would be considered an enemy.

  • You said the troops advanced to capture Waterloo, was Waterloo captured?

  • Yes, my Lord. We advanced and captured Waterloo.

  • Witness, can you give us a time frame at this stage?

  • Well, this happened around 23 December 1998.

  • Did anything happen when the troops arrived in Waterloo?

  • Well, yes. We captured Waterloo and we were giving messages to the civilian populace that we have come, those of us who had gone had come again, that they should come and join us and that we have come to reinstate the army as SAJ has said that this was a way of cajoling the civilians. That those of us who they had pushed out had come back. That we have come to reinstate the army and that the people should support us. So we were talking to the people in Waterloo, giving them messages to go and tell the people in Freetown that we were coming.

  • Did anything else happen in Waterloo?

  • Well, later SAJ Musa sat together with the brigade administrator whilst the others were looting, looting to get logistics like rice and other things in Waterloo, SAJ summoned Foday Bah Marah and told him to take some men so that we can go and capture Benguema. Whilst they were in Waterloo Foday Bah took me and some other men. We were mixed. We went to attack Benguema. When we attempted the ECOMOG responded with a heavy support firing. That caused Bulldoze, that is Foday Bah Marah, to tell us to wait and as he was going to inform SAJ that the manpower that was in Benguema was very heavy. So I and the other men waited until later when we saw the brigade coming. SAJ --

  • I would ask you to pause. You're talking about looting taking place in Waterloo. Who was looting?

  • Well, this was done by the combined team that came because that was the area where we found food and other things, so everybody was taking.

  • Who were you looting from?

  • The civilians whom we met at Waterloo, they were the ones we were taking things from.

  • At this stage in Waterloo witness, where was the Red Lion battalion?

  • Well, as I said, it was a brigade advance. All of us came to Waterloo.

  • Do you know if SAJ Musa was aware that the troops were looting?

  • Well, you know he was sitting down, because when we captured Waterloo at the junction they were sitting down there, himself, Bazzy and Gullit. Everybody was taking what he wanted. The looting was going on.

  • So does that mean he knew?

  • Yes, he saw with his own very eyes. He saw that people were taking things that they wanted. Everybody was taking what he wanted.

  • You were saying that you and the other men waited until later you saw the brigade coming.

  • Can you please continue from there?

  • Well, when the brigade got closer to us we advanced and this time SAJ Musa joined with the advance. He had an AA and he was shooting continually and later we used a 60 millimetre mortar. Finally we disorganised the ECOMOG force that we found in Benguema and we captured Benguema. At that time everybody was busy because Benguema is a military training centre so everybody was busy in Benguema. Some people were looting, some people were taking ammunition, everything. Whilst this was going on --

  • Witness, can I pause you there first please. What is an AA?

  • It's the anti-aircraft weapon. It's a support weapon.

  • Please continue. You were saying while this was going on?

  • Well, while this was going on I, Bazzy, O-Five, Colonel Eddie went towards where they had mounted a 120 millimetre mortar. We were trying to fix the plate very close to the drill shell and the ammunition dump.

  • Who had mounted the 120 millimetre weapon?

  • Well, this weapon was being used by the ECOMOG to bombard our base at Mamamah.

  • Please continue, witness.

  • So whilst we were trying to fix the plate we heard an explosion, a heavy explosion, in Benguema. So in this explosion all of us stood and saw one Barrie who was also a PS, personal security, Captain Barrie, to SAJ Musa. He was carrying somebody. He said, "Oh, Eagle, problem." He said, "Eagle has encountered a problem." So he put him down.

  • Witness, I will ask you to pause. Your Honours, Barrie is B-A-R-R-I-E. Witness, who is Eagle?

  • Well, it was SAJ Musa. That was his call sign that he was using, Eagle.

  • Please continue, witness.

  • So within that period they brought the - broke a door and put SAJ on it. O-Five was trying to give milk to SAJ, but SAJ could not take it. So they started saying, "Oh, it looks like Eagle has died." But when they laid SAJ, the helmet that he was wearing was pierced, something that I myself saw. After that Amara Kallay told me that, "Ice T, let's move away from this area, let's go." He said because if the other men found out that SAJ had died this would cause a very serious problem, so let us go. So I too left there. By then Gullit had come there, Five-Five had come. I left Bazzy, Colonel Eddie, O-Five. They were all close to the corpse and I left and I joined Amara Kallay and we moved towards Macdonald.

  • Witness, I am going to ask you to pause. At this stage now did you know what happened to SAJ Musa?

  • Well, from what I saw, when they gave SAJ the milk straight off I knew SAJ had died.

  • Did you know what had happened to him prior to him being carried to where you were?

  • Well, this bomb exploded in that area. That was what they said. Gullit said the bomb killed SAJ.

  • Well it was in Benguema that this incident happened, but after that - after we had left - I and Amara Kallay and others, Junior Lion, and we went to Macdonald where we settled, the troops were divided. Gullit, Five-Five, O-Five, Hassan Papa Bangura, all of them were together with SAJ's corpse. They were also around the hill in Benguema.

  • Witness, I am going to ask you to pause there to explain to the Court what is it that you saw when you said you saw his helmet pierced - SAJ's helmet. What did you see?

  • Well what I saw was a bullet hole that went through that hit SAJ, because you can see where the bullet went through, where it was pierced, and so I believed that SAJ was shot. Later the rumour was doing the round around the brigade that it was Gullit who killed SAJ.

  • You said that you returned and you saw Gullit, Five-Five, O-Five and Hassan Papa Bangura with SAJ Musa's corpse. Can you continue from there, please?

  • I said I left them there. When all of them had come I moved with Amara Kallay and we went to Macdonald Hill where Junior Lion, Foday Bah, Basky and some other men and other members whom we were fighting together with based. There was a day that we were not able to see Gullit and their own group, so later a patrol team located us and brought us to where Gullit was based. So, when we got there to my surprise I saw Gullit fully dressed with - fully dressed in SAJ Musa's helmet and the uniform that SAJ Musa was wearing, and above all Alabama, who was SAJ Musa's CSO, was very close to Gullit.

  • Witness, I am going to ask you to pause. Your Honours, I apologise for not directing your attention to this earlier, but at the time the witness was explaining about what he saw with the helmet he had pointed to the right-hand side of his temple and I just wanted the court record to reflect that.

  • Yes, we will put on record that the witness indicated with his hand the right-hand side of his temple while describing the helmet being pierced by a bullet at the side of the head. The side of the forehead, in fact.

  • Yes, your Honour. Thank you:

  • Witness, what happened after you saw Gullit dressed in SAJ Musa's uniform and helmet?

  • Well, Gullit did not say anything. Automatically we all recognised him as the commander, so he was in full control of the troops now.

  • Witness, what if anything happened to SAJ Musa's corpse?

  • Well, when we got there Gullit said they have buried SAJ Musa at Koba Water area. He said they have buried him.

  • Your Honours, Macdonald is spelt M-A-C-D-O-N-A-L-D, Alabama is ALABAMA, Koba Water is K-O-B-A and Water the normal spelling:

  • Witness, do you recall the date that SAJ Musa was buried?

  • Well, as I said, we almost entered on 23 December and he died that night in the morning hours of the 24th. As far as I can recall it was at that time, because when we came they had buried him.

  • So which date is it, 23 or 24 December?

  • It should be the 24th, because it was on the 23rd that we attacked Benguema. That was when he died. So, on 24th in the morning that was when they said they buried him.

  • Did anything else happen after this?

  • Well after this, we got to that point, Gullit said we should go deep into the jungle.

  • We came towards deep into the Benguema - the hills around Benguema. It was around there that we went.

  • What happened after Gullit said the troop should go deep into the jungle?

  • Well, after this Gullit restructured the brigade and made some other appointments.

  • While restructuring the brigade, did Gullit say anything?

  • Well the only thing that Gullit said when he saw I and Keforkeh, he said that captain promotion that we were going along with we were not supposed to be going along with a captain promotion. He said we should be acting as lieutenants until we prove ourselves well. He said I and Keforkeh should not carry that promotion. That was what he told us.

  • Did Gullit's position change at this stage?

  • Yes, my Lord.

  • What did it change to?

  • Well, straightaway Gullit became - he later became - after SAJ's death he became the chief in command and he made other appointments.

  • Do you recall the other appointments he made?

  • Yes, I can recall.

  • What were the other appointments?

  • He made Bazzy the deputy chief in command and a member of the brigade administration. He made Santigie Borbor Kanu to continue his position as chief of staff and member of the brigade administration. He also appointed Franklyn Conteh, whom we also called Woyoh. He made him the director of operations, DOO.

  • Did anything happen to the ranks of the battalion commanders?

  • Yes, he also promoted the lieutenant colonels to colonels.

  • Did Alabama have any assignment at this stage?

  • Yes, Alabama was still with him as his CSO.

  • Did anything happen to O-Five's position, who you said earlier was operations commander?

  • No, my Lord. O-Five remained to be the operation commander. He also appointed Foyoh as the mission commander, Colonel Foyoh. He also appointed Junior George Johnson as the task force commander. Then he appointed Roadblock, Commander Roadblock, as the military police commander.

  • Was there a deputy operations commander?

  • Yes, my Lord. He appointed Junior Sherrif as the deputy operations commander.

  • At this stage were there any changes as to the number of battalions?

  • Well, the battalion remained the same.

  • Can you remind us again what they were?

  • We had the 1st battalion, the 2nd battalion, the 3rd battalion, the 4th battalion and the 5th battalion, RDF and the Red Lion battalion.

  • Were there any changes in the commanders of these battalions?

  • Yes, there were slight changes in the commanders. For instance the RDF had a commander, but he was an SLA. We called him NPFL. They appointed him as commander for the RDF because Colonel Terminator had had a problem and also Bulldoze, Foday Marah, we also called him Bulldoze, they made him the second battalion commander. We also had Foday Bah Marah, who was Bulldoze. He became the G4 commander. He was responsible for all arms and ammunition that we had. He kept them. We had civilians who would carry those ammunition as we went along, so we called him G4.

  • Witness, at this point the family members that you have been referring to who were the captured civilians, where were they?

  • They were all taken to the jungle. We did not leave them behind.

  • You testified that there were SBUs with the various battalions. At this point where were the SBUs?

  • I said the entire brigade, including the SBUs, the family members, all of them went to that Macdonald Hill.

  • The SBUs, were they still divided amongst the various battalions?

  • Yes, my Lord. They were with the various battalions and commanders.

  • Do you recall if the Red Lion battalion had SBUs?

  • Yes, they too had SBUs that were with them.

  • Did your position change, witness?

  • Well, the only position was that I still remained as a front line - as combat commander always engaged at the battlefront, because Gullit too said we should prove ourselves because he too questioned our promotion that was made by SAJ Musa.

  • Witness, you have said "front line' and you have said "combat commander". Can you be a bit clearer as to what your position was at this point?

  • Well, as I am saying, when I say "front line" it is the same word, "combat". When you are in the combat zone you are in the front line. It is a killing zone and so you were always engaged - you are always engaged in battles.